CONSCIENCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - conscience in Sense and Sensibility
1  I could not have answered it to my conscience to let it fall into any other hands.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
2  Not so, indeed; for, seriously speaking, I am very sure that conscience only kept Edward from Harley Street.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
3  And I really believe he HAS the most delicate conscience in the world; the most scrupulous in performing every engagement, however minute, and however it may make against his interest or pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
4  The expense would be nothing, the inconvenience not more; and it was altogether an attention which the delicacy of his conscience pointed out to be requisite to its complete enfranchisement from his promise to his father.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
5  He saw the necessity of inviting the Miss Steeles immediately, and his conscience was pacified by the resolution of inviting his sisters another year; at the same time, however, slyly suspecting that another year would make the invitation needless, by bringing Elinor to town as Colonel Brandon's wife, and Marianne as THEIR visitor.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
6  Her manners gave some re-assurance to Edward, and he had courage enough to sit down; but his embarrassment still exceeded that of the ladies in a proportion, which the case rendered reasonable, though his sex might make it rare; for his heart had not the indifference of Lucy's, nor could his conscience have quite the ease of Elinor's.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
7  The whole of Lucy's behaviour in the affair, and the prosperity which crowned it, therefore, may be held forth as a most encouraging instance of what an earnest, an unceasing attention to self-interest, however its progress may be apparently obstructed, will do in securing every advantage of fortune, with no other sacrifice than that of time and conscience.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50