DEATH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - death in Great Expectations
1  "I'll eat my breakfast afore they're the death of me," said he.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
2  And thus, in the gloom and death of the night, we stared at one another.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
3  My mind, with inconceivable rapidity followed out all the consequences of such a death.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
4  And I had heard of the death of her husband, from an accident consequent on his ill-treatment of a horse.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIX
5  He'd no more heart than a iron file, he was as cold as death, and he had the head of the Devil afore mentioned.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLII
6  We don't know what you have done, but we wouldn't have you starved to death for it, poor miserable fellow-creatur.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
7  The death close before me was terrible, but far more terrible than death was the dread of being misremembered after death.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
8  I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
9  And then I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
10  Again my mind, with its former inconceivable rapidity, had exhausted the whole subject of the attack upon my sister, her illness, and her death, before his slow and hesitating speech had formed these words.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
11  When his body was found, many miles from the scene of his death, and so horribly disfigured that he was only recognizable by the contents of his pockets, notes were still legible, folded in a case he carried.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
12  When we got back, he had the hardihood to tell me that he wished my sister could have known I had done her so much honor, and to hint that she would have considered it reasonably purchased at the price of her death.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
13  Put the case, Pip, that passion and the terror of death had a little shaken the woman's intellects, and that when she was set at liberty, she was scared out of the ways of the world, and went to him to be sheltered.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LI
14  In my rooms too, with which she had never been at all associated, there was at once the blankness of death and a perpetual suggestion of the sound of her voice or the turn of her face or figure, as if she were still alive and had been often there.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
15  He who had been presented in the worst light at his trial, who had since broken prison and had been tried again, who had returned from transportation under a life sentence, and who had occasioned the death of the man who was the cause of his arrest.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
16  So furious had been the gusts, that high buildings in town had had the lead stripped off their roofs; and in the country, trees had been torn up, and sails of windmills carried away; and gloomy accounts had come in from the coast, of shipwreck and death.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX