DISTRESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - distress in Sense and Sensibility
1  Elinor, affected by his relation, and still more by his distress, could not speak.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
2  He looked rather distressed as he added, that he had been staying with some friends near Plymouth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
3  He too was much distressed; and they sat down together in a most promising state of embarrassment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
4  He would then have suffered under the pecuniary distresses which, because they are removed, he now reckons as nothing.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
5  "I did," said Elinor, with a composure of voice, under which was concealed an emotion and distress beyond any thing she had ever felt before.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
6  He imagined, and calmly could he imagine it, that her extravagance, and consequent distress, had obliged her to dispose of it for some immediate relief.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
7  It is not so very likely he should be distressed in his circumstances NOW, for he is a very prudent man, and to be sure must have cleared the estate by this time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
8  Elinor, distressed by this charge of reserve in herself, which she was not at liberty to do away, knew not how, under such circumstances, to press for greater openness in Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
9  Elinor answered in some distress that she was, and then talked of head-aches, low spirits, and over fatigues; and of every thing to which she could decently attribute her sister's behaviour.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
10  The necessity of concealing from her mother and Marianne, what had been entrusted in confidence to herself, though it obliged her to unceasing exertion, was no aggravation of Elinor's distress.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
11  His demands and your inexperience together, on a small, very small income, must have brought on distresses which would not be the LESS grievous to you, from having been entirely unknown and unthought of before.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
12  From their counsel, or their conversation, she knew she could receive no assistance, their tenderness and sorrow must add to her distress, while her self-command would neither receive encouragement from their example nor from their praise.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
13  She wondered, with little intermission what could be the reason of it; was sure there must be some bad news, and thought over every kind of distress that could have befallen him, with a fixed determination that he should not escape them all.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
14  Elinor, who did justice to Mrs. Jennings's kindness, though its effusions were often distressing, and sometimes almost ridiculous, made her those acknowledgments, and returned her those civilities, which her sister could not make or return for herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
15  Elinor was to be the comforter of others in her own distresses, no less than in theirs; and all the comfort that could be given by assurances of her own composure of mind, and a very earnest vindication of Edward from every charge but of imprudence, was readily offered.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
16  Marianne had retreated as much as possible out of sight, to conceal her distress; and Margaret, understanding some part, but not the whole of the case, thought it incumbent on her to be dignified, and therefore took a seat as far from him as she could, and maintained a strict silence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48
17  Mrs. Dashwood, whose eyes, as she answered the servant's inquiry, had intuitively taken the same direction, was shocked to perceive by Elinor's countenance how much she really suffered, and a moment afterwards, alike distressed by Marianne's situation, knew not on which child to bestow her principal attention.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47