DREADFUL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - dreadful in Great Expectations
1  You've been lying out on the meshes, and they're dreadful aguish.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
2  Compeyson's wife and me took him up to bed agen, and he raved most dreadful.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLII
3  I got a dreadful start, when I thought I heard the file still going; but it was only a sheep-bell.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
4  Words cannot tell what a sense I had, at the same time, of the dreadful mystery that he was to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
5  Yet I am afraid the dreadful truth is, Herbert, that he is attached to me, strongly attached to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
6  This dilated until it filled the room, and impelled me to take a candle and go in and look at my dreadful burden.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
7  I felt that I must have something in reserve for my dreadful acquaintance, and his ally the still more dreadful young man.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
8  The dreadful condition to which he was brought, was so appalling to both of us, that we could not refer to it in plainer words.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
9  '"'I don't know how she's there,' says Arthur, shivering dreadful with the horrors, 'but she's standing in the corner at the foot of the bed, awful mad.'
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLII
10  As Estella looked back over her shoulder before going out at the door, Miss Havisham kissed that hand to her, with a ravenous intensity that was of its kind quite dreadful.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
11  She was even more dreadfully fond of Estella than she had been when I last saw them together; I repeat the word advisedly, for there was something positively dreadful in the energy of her looks and embraces.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
12  I tried to rest him on the arm I could use, in any easy position; but it was dreadful to think that I could not be sorry at heart for his being badly hurt, since it was unquestionably best that he should die.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
13  Years afterwards, I made a dreadful likeness of that woman, by causing a face that had no other natural resemblance to it than it derived from flowing hair to pass behind a bowl of flaming spirits in a dark room.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
14  For the fugitive out on the marshes with the ironed leg, the mysterious young man, the file, the food, and the dreadful pledge I was under to commit a larceny on those sheltering premises, rose before me in the avenging coals.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
15  To stand in the dark in a mysterious passage of an unknown house, bawling Estella to a scornful young lady neither visible nor responsive, and feeling it a dreadful liberty so to roar out her name, was almost as bad as playing to order.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  It then occurred to me as possible that the man might have slipped into my rooms; so, lighting my candle at the watchman's, and leaving him standing at the door, I examined them carefully, including the room in which my dreaded guest lay asleep.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
17  That Compeyson stood in mortal fear of him, neither of the two could know much better than I; and that any such man as that man had been described to be would hesitate to release himself for good from a dreaded enemy by the safe means of becoming an informer was scarcely to be imagined.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIII
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