DRESSED in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - dressed in Great Expectations
1  He is dressed like a 'spectable pieman.'
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
2  My hands had been dressed twice or thrice in the night, and again in the morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter L
3  Dresses, less splendid than the dress she wore, and half-packed trunks, were scattered about.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
4  They kept me very quiet all day, and kept my arm constantly dressed, and gave me cooling drinks.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
5  Then, I got up and partly dressed, and sat at the window to take a last look out, and in taking it fell asleep.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
6  Moving the lamp as the man moved, I made out that he was substantially dressed, but roughly, like a voyager by sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
7  The more I dressed him and the better I dressed him, the more he looked like the slouching fugitive on the marshes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
8  On this last evening, I dressed my self out in my new clothes for their delight, and sat in my splendor until bedtime.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
9  The marriage day was fixed, the wedding dresses were bought, the wedding tour was planned out, the wedding guests were invited.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
10  I saw that the dress had been put upon the rounded figure of a young woman, and that the figure upon which it now hung loose had shrunk to skin and bone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
11  I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers, and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
12  Once, I had been taken to one of our old marsh churches to see a skeleton in the ashes of a rich dress that had been dug out of a vault under the church pavement.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
13  As he was at present dressed in a seafaring slop suit, in which he looked as if he had some parrots and cigars to dispose of, I next discussed with him what dress he should wear.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
14  Indeed, I was not only so changed in the course of nature, but so differently dressed and so differently circumstanced, that it was not at all likely he could have known me without accidental help.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
15  We dined on these occasions in the kitchen, and adjourned, for the nuts and oranges and apples to the parlor; which was a change very like Joe's change from his working-clothes to his Sunday dress.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
16  And yet this man was dressed in coarse gray, too, and had a great iron on his leg, and was lame, and hoarse, and cold, and was everything that the other man was; except that he had not the same face, and had a flat broad-brimmed low-crowned felt hat on.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
17  In a back room, a high-shouldered man with a face-ache tied up in dirty flannel, who was dressed in old black clothes that bore the appearance of having been waxed, was stooping over his work of making fair copies of the notes of the other two gentlemen, for Mr. Jaggers's own use.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
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