EAT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - eat in Sense and Sensibility
1  Marianne had already sent to say, that she should eat nothing more.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
2  They met for the sake of eating, drinking, and laughing together, playing at cards, or consequences, or any other game that was sufficiently noisy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
3  She could scarcely eat any dinner, and when they afterwards returned to the drawing room, seemed anxiously listening to the sound of every carriage.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
4  Marianne was to have the best place by the fire, was to be tempted to eat by every delicacy in the house, and to be amused by the relation of all the news of the day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
5  He was nice in his eating, uncertain in his hours; fond of his child, though affecting to slight it; and idled away the mornings at billiards, which ought to have been devoted to business.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
6  She avoided the looks of them all, could neither eat nor speak, and after some time, on her mother's silently pressing her hand with tender compassion, her small degree of fortitude was quite overcome, she burst into tears and left the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
7  At breakfast she neither ate, nor attempted to eat any thing; and Elinor's attention was then all employed, not in urging her, not in pitying her, nor in appearing to regard her, but in endeavouring to engage Mrs. Jennings's notice entirely to herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
8  He was a blessing to all the juvenile part of the neighbourhood, for in summer he was for ever forming parties to eat cold ham and chicken out of doors, and in winter his private balls were numerous enough for any young lady who was not suffering under the unsatiable appetite of fifteen.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7