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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - end in Sense and Sensibility
1  You may see the end of the house.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
2  They were obliged to put an end to such an expectation.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
3  I believe it would be the wisest way to put an end to the business at once by dissolving the engagement.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
4  Another pause therefore of many minutes' duration, succeeded this speech, and Lucy was still the first to end it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
5  MY gratitude will be insured immediately by any information tending to that end, and HERS must be gained by it in time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
6  Yet, he must leave them at the end of a week, in spite of their wishes and his own, and without any restraint on his time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
7  Sir John was loud in his admiration at the end of every song, and as loud in his conversation with the others while every song lasted.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  We seem so beset with difficulties on every side, that though it would make us miserable for a time, we should be happier perhaps in the end.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
9  But as they drew towards the end of it, their interest in the appearance of a country which they were to inhabit overcame their dejection, and a view of Barton Valley as they entered it gave them cheerfulness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
10  Elinor joyfully profited by the first of these proposals, and thus by a little of that address which Marianne could never condescend to practise, gained her own end, and pleased Lady Middleton at the same time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
11  His kindness was not confined to words; for within an hour after he left them, a large basket full of garden stuff and fruit arrived from the park, which was followed before the end of the day by a present of game.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
12  She began almost to feel a dislike of Edward; and it ended, as every feeling must end with her, by carrying back her thoughts to Willoughby, whose manners formed a contrast sufficiently striking to those of his brother elect.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
13  Lady Middleton seemed to be roused to enjoyment only by the entrance of her four noisy children after dinner, who pulled her about, tore her clothes, and put an end to every kind of discourse except what related to themselves.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
14  Recollecting, soon afterwards, that he was probably dividing Elinor from her sister, he put an end to his visit, receiving from her again the same grateful acknowledgments, and leaving her full of compassion and esteem for him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
15  Her mother too, in whose mind not one speculative thought of their marriage had been raised, by his prospect of riches, was led before the end of a week to hope and expect it; and secretly to congratulate herself on having gained two such sons-in-law as Edward and Willoughby.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
16  I believe you are right, my love; it will be better that there should be no annuity in the case; whatever I may give them occasionally will be of far greater assistance than a yearly allowance, because they would only enlarge their style of living if they felt sure of a larger income, and would not be sixpence the richer for it at the end of the year.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
17  They were engaged about the end of that time to attend Lady Middleton to a party, from which Mrs. Jennings was kept away by the indisposition of her youngest daughter; and for this party, Marianne, wholly dispirited, careless of her appearance, and seeming equally indifferent whether she went or staid, prepared, without one look of hope or one expression of pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
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