EQUALITY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - equality in Sense and Sensibility
1  Mrs. Palmer, in her way, was equally angry.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
2  Lady Middleton was equally pleased with Mrs. Dashwood.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
3  Their means were as different as their objects, and equally suited to the advancement of each.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
4  Her opinion varying with every fresh conjecture, and all seeming equally probable as they arose.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
5  The two grandmothers, with not less partiality, but more sincerity, were equally earnest in support of their own descendant.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
6  But in sorrow she must be equally carried away by her fancy, and as far beyond consolation as in pleasure she was beyond alloy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
7  Mrs. Jennings and Mrs. Palmer joined their entreaties, all seemed equally anxious to avoid a family party; and the young ladies were obliged to yield.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
8  From all danger of seeing Willoughby again, her mother considered her to be at least equally safe in town as in the country, since his acquaintance must now be dropped by all who called themselves her friends.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
9  As John Dashwood had no more pleasure in music than his eldest sister, his mind was equally at liberty to fix on any thing else; and a thought struck him during the evening, which he communicated to his wife, for her approbation, when they got home.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
10  In Bond Street especially, where much of their business lay, her eyes were in constant inquiry; and in whatever shop the party were engaged, her mind was equally abstracted from every thing actually before them, from all that interested and occupied the others.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
11  That some kind of engagement had subsisted between Willoughby and Marianne she could not doubt, and that Willoughby was weary of it, seemed equally clear; for however Marianne might still feed her own wishes, SHE could not attribute such behaviour to mistake or misapprehension of any kind.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
12  Lady Middleton had sent a very civil message by him, denoting her intention of waiting on Mrs. Dashwood as soon as she could be assured that her visit would be no inconvenience; and as this message was answered by an invitation equally polite, her ladyship was introduced to them the next day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
13  Had both the children been there, the affair might have been determined too easily by measuring them at once; but as Harry only was present, it was all conjectural assertion on both sides; and every body had a right to be equally positive in their opinion, and to repeat it over and over again as often as they liked.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
14  They were engaged about the end of that time to attend Lady Middleton to a party, from which Mrs. Jennings was kept away by the indisposition of her youngest daughter; and for this party, Marianne, wholly dispirited, careless of her appearance, and seeming equally indifferent whether she went or staid, prepared, without one look of hope or one expression of pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
15  It was evident that he was unhappy; she wished it were equally evident that he still distinguished her by the same affection which once she had felt no doubt of inspiring; but hitherto the continuance of his preference seemed very uncertain; and the reservedness of his manner towards her contradicted one moment what a more animated look had intimated the preceding one.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
16  Elinor was obliged, though unwillingly, to believe that the sentiments which Mrs. Jennings had assigned him for her own satisfaction, were now actually excited by her sister; and that however a general resemblance of disposition between the parties might forward the affection of Mr. Willoughby, an equally striking opposition of character was no hindrance to the regard of Colonel Brandon.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
17  Elinor and her mother rose up in amazement at their entrance, and while the eyes of both were fixed on him with an evident wonder and a secret admiration which equally sprung from his appearance, he apologized for his intrusion by relating its cause, in a manner so frank and so graceful that his person, which was uncommonly handsome, received additional charms from his voice and expression.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
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