EVENING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - evening in Great Expectations
1  In the evening there was rowing on the river.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
2  Mr. Wopsle, as the ill-requited uncle of the evening's tragedy, fell to meditating aloud in his garden at Camberwell.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
3  On this last evening, I dressed my self out in my new clothes for their delight, and sat in my splendor until bedtime.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
4  It did not appear quite so unlikely to me that evening, as it would have done if we had discussed it a few hours before.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
5  This was understood to terminate the Course for the evening, and we emerged into the air with shrieks of intellectual victory.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
6  I had not seen Mr. Wemmick for some weeks, when I thought I would write him a note and propose to go home with him on a certain evening.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
7  My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things seems to me to have been gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
8  After that I fell among those thieves, the nine figures, who seemed every evening to do something new to disguise themselves and baffle recognition.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
9  I said to Biddy we would walk a little farther, and we did so, and the summer afternoon toned down into the summer evening, and it was very beautiful.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
10  I had received strict orders from my sister to call for him at the Three Jolly Bargemen, that evening, on my way from school, and bring him home at my peril.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
11  In a corner was a little table of papers with a shaded lamp: so that he seemed to bring the office home with him in that respect too, and to wheel it out of an evening and fall to work.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
12  On this particular evening the urgency of my case demanded a pint of this mixture, which was poured down my throat, for my greater comfort, while Mrs. Joe held my head under her arm, as a boot would be held in a bootjack.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
13  I recalled the hopeless circumstances by which she had been surrounded in the miserable little shop and the miserable little noisy evening school, with that miserable old bundle of incompetence always to be dragged and shouldered.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
14  Now, as to Orlick; he had gone to town exactly as he told us when we picked him up at the turnpike, he had been seen about town all the evening, he had been in divers companies in several public-houses, and he had come back with myself and Mr. Wopsle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
15  In the evening we went out for a walk in the streets, and went half-price to the Theatre; and next day we went to church at Westminster Abbey, and in the afternoon we walked in the Parks; and I wondered who shod all the horses there, and wished Joe did.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
16  So subdued I was by those tears, and by their breaking out again in the course of the quiet walk, that when I was on the coach, and it was clear of the town, I deliberated with an aching heart whether I would not get down when we changed horses and walk back, and have another evening at home, and a better parting.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
17  Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
18  When he had at last done and had appointed to send the articles to Mr. Pumblechook's on the Thursday evening, he said, with his hand upon the parlor lock, "I know, sir, that London gentlemen cannot be expected to patronize local work, as a rule; but if you would give me a turn now and then in the quality of a townsman, I should greatly esteem it."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
19  It being Saturday night, I found the landlord looking rather grimly at these records; but as my business was with Joe and not with him, I merely wished him good evening, and passed into the common room at the end of the passage, where there was a bright large kitchen fire, and where Joe was smoking his pipe in company with Mr. Wopsle and a stranger.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
20  Yet in the London streets so crowded with people and so brilliantly lighted in the dusk of evening, there were depressing hints of reproaches for that I had put the poor old kitchen at home so far away; and in the dead of night, the footsteps of some incapable impostor of a porter mooning about Barnard's Inn, under pretence of watching it, fell hollow on my heart.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII