EXPECTATIONS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - expectations in Sense and Sensibility
1  At any rate I shall expect you to-morrow.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
2  They were obliged to put an end to such an expectation.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
3  Miss Marianne must not expect to have all the men to herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
4  "She expects to be confined in February," continued Mrs. Jennings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
5  Mrs. Dashwood now looked at her daughter; but Elinor knew better than to expect them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
6  I wrote to him, my love, last week, and rather expect to see, than to hear from him again.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48
7  But one must not expect every thing; though I suppose it would be no difficult matter to widen them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
8  The disappointment of the evening before seemed forgotten in the expectation of what was to happen that day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
9  So far it was all as she had foreseen; but on entering the house she beheld what no foresight had taught her to expect.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
10  But they had no curiosity to see how Mr. and Mrs. Palmer ate their dinner, and no expectation of pleasure from them in any other way.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
11  In seasons of cheerfulness, no temper could be more cheerful than hers, or possess, in a greater degree, that sanguine expectation of happiness which is happiness itself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
12  Elinor had seen so little of Mr. Palmer, and in that little had seen so much variety in his address to her sister and herself, that she knew not what to expect to find him in his own family.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
13  She received the news with resolute composure; made no observation on it, and at first shed no tears; but after a short time they would burst out, and for the rest of the day, she was in a state hardly less pitiable than when she first learnt to expect the event.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
14  Her mother too, in whose mind not one speculative thought of their marriage had been raised, by his prospect of riches, was led before the end of a week to hope and expect it; and secretly to congratulate herself on having gained two such sons-in-law as Edward and Willoughby.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
15  Marianne was of no use on these occasions, as she would never learn the game; but though her time was therefore at her own disposal, the evening was by no means more productive of pleasure to her than to Elinor, for it was spent in all the anxiety of expectation and the pain of disappointment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
16  He came, examined his patient, and though encouraging Miss Dashwood to expect that a very few days would restore her sister to health, yet, by pronouncing her disorder to have a putrid tendency, and allowing the word "infection" to pass his lips, gave instant alarm to Mrs. Palmer, on her baby's account.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
17  She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother's great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars's resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN; that Mrs. Dashwood could neither pretend to be unconscious, nor endeavor to be calm.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
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