EYES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - eyes in Sense and Sensibility
1  When he was present she had no eyes for any one else.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
2  In my eyes it would be no marriage at all, but that would be nothing.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
3  Mr. Palmer made her no answer, and did not even raise his eyes from the newspaper.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
4  His eyes want all that spirit, that fire, which at once announce virtue and intelligence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
5  Her eyes were red and swollen; and it seemed as if her tears were even then restrained with difficulty.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
6  In about half an hour her mother returned, and though her eyes were red, her countenance was not uncheerful.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
7  Marianne lifted up her eyes in astonishment, and Elinor conjectured that she might as well have held her tongue.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
8  Mrs. Dashwood looked with pleasure at Marianne, whose fine eyes were fixed so expressively on Willoughby, as plainly denoted how well she understood him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
9  The closing of the little gate, at the entrance of the green court in front of the house, drew her eyes to the window, and she saw a large party walking up to the door.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
10  And yet I do assure you," replied Lucy, her little sharp eyes full of meaning, "there seemed to me to be a coldness and displeasure in your manner that made me quite uncomfortable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
11  I am glad," said Lady Middleton to Lucy, "you are not going to finish poor little Annamaria's basket this evening; for I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
12  They were no sooner in the passage than Marianne came hastily out of the parlour apparently in violent affliction, with her handkerchief at her eyes; and without noticing them ran up stairs.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
13  At first sight, his address is certainly not striking; and his person can hardly be called handsome, till the expression of his eyes, which are uncommonly good, and the general sweetness of his countenance, is perceived.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
14  Marianne was vexed at it for her sister's sake, and turned her eyes towards Elinor to see how she bore these attacks, with an earnestness which gave Elinor far more pain than could arise from such common-place raillery as Mrs. Jennings's.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
15  In Bond Street especially, where much of their business lay, her eyes were in constant inquiry; and in whatever shop the party were engaged, her mind was equally abstracted from every thing actually before them, from all that interested and occupied the others.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
16  Her skin was very brown, but, from its transparency, her complexion was uncommonly brilliant; her features were all good; her smile was sweet and attractive; and in her eyes, which were very dark, there was a life, a spirit, an eagerness, which could hardily be seen without delight.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
17  Elinor and her mother rose up in amazement at their entrance, and while the eyes of both were fixed on him with an evident wonder and a secret admiration which equally sprung from his appearance, he apologized for his intrusion by relating its cause, in a manner so frank and so graceful that his person, which was uncommonly handsome, received additional charms from his voice and expression.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
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