FAMILY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - family in Sense and Sensibility
1  A family cannot well be maintained on a smaller.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
2  The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
3  She would have been ashamed to look her family in the face the next morning, had she not risen from her bed in more need of repose than when she lay down in it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
4  They were scarcely ever without some friends staying with them in the house, and they kept more company of every kind than any other family in the neighbourhood.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  The whole family perceived it, and Mrs. Dashwood, attributing it to some want of liberality in his mother, sat down to table indignant against all selfish parents.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
6  To Marianne it had all the distinguishing tenderness which a lover's heart could give, and to the rest of the family it was the affectionate attention of a son and a brother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
7  The arrival of a new family in the country was always a matter of joy to him, and in every point of view he was charmed with the inhabitants he had now procured for his cottage at Barton.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  As for the house itself, to be sure," said she, "it is too small for our family, but we will make ourselves tolerably comfortable for the present, as it is too late in the year for improvements.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
9  Mr. John Dashwood had not the strong feelings of the rest of the family; but he was affected by a recommendation of such a nature at such a time, and he promised to do every thing in his power to make them comfortable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
10  Mrs. John Dashwood had never been a favourite with any of her husband's family; but she had had no opportunity, till the present, of shewing them with how little attention to the comfort of other people she could act when occasion required it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
11  The slightest mention of anything relative to Willoughby overpowered her in an instant; and though her family were most anxiously attentive to her comfort, it was impossible for them, if they spoke at all, to keep clear of every subject which her feelings connected with him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
12  But her death, which happened ten years before his own, produced a great alteration in his home; for to supply her loss, he invited and received into his house the family of his nephew Mr. Henry Dashwood, the legal inheritor of the Norland estate, and the person to whom he intended to bequeath it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
13  His coldness and reserve mortified her severely; she was vexed and half angry; but resolving to regulate her behaviour to him by the past rather than the present, she avoided every appearance of resentment or displeasure, and treated him as she thought he ought to be treated from the family connection.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
14  He said much of his earnest desire of their living in the most sociable terms with his family, and pressed them so cordially to dine at Barton Park every day till they were better settled at home, that, though his entreaties were carried to a point of perseverance beyond civility, they could not give offence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
15  He was received by Mrs. Dashwood with more than politeness; with a kindness which Sir John's account of him and her own gratitude prompted; and every thing that passed during the visit tended to assure him of the sense, elegance, mutual affection, and domestic comfort of the family to whom accident had now introduced him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
16  In showing kindness to his cousins therefore he had the real satisfaction of a good heart; and in settling a family of females only in his cottage, he had all the satisfaction of a sportsman; for a sportsman, though he esteems only those of his sex who are sportsmen likewise, is not often desirous of encouraging their taste by admitting them to a residence within his own manor.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
17  Their visitors, except those from Barton Park, were not many; for, in spite of Sir John's urgent entreaties that they would mix more in the neighbourhood, and repeated assurances of his carriage being always at their service, the independence of Mrs. Dashwood's spirit overcame the wish of society for her children; and she was resolute in declining to visit any family beyond the distance of a walk.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
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