FEAR in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - fear in Great Expectations
1  Waking, I never lost that fear.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
2  Still, no new cause for fear arose.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVII
3  A fearful man, all in coarse gray, with a great iron on his leg.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
4  In short, I was always full of fears for the rash man who was in hiding.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI
5  I stopped, fearing I might say too much, or had already said it, and we took another look at each other.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  He would do nothing to make it a desperate venture, and he had very little fear of his safety with such good help.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI
7  With these fears upon me, I began either to imagine or recall that I had had mysterious warnings of this man's approach.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
8  I could not have said what I was afraid of, for my fear was altogether undefined and vague, but there was great fear upon me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
9  I do not recall that I felt any tenderness of conscience in reference to Mrs. Joe, when the fear of being found out was lifted off me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
10  A new fear had been engendered in my mind by his narrative; or rather, his narrative had given form and purpose to the fear that was already there.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIII
11  Nor, did Miss Havisham's manner towards Estella in anywise change, except that I believed it to have something like fear infused among its former characteristics.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
12  The fear of losing Joe's confidence, and of thenceforth sitting in the chimney corner at night staring drearily at my forever lost companion and friend, tied up my tongue.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
13  And she an't over partial to having scholars on the premises," Joe continued, "and in partickler would not be over partial to my being a scholar, for fear as I might rise.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
14  I had the wildest dreams concerning him, and woke unrefreshed; I woke, too, to recover the fear which I had lost in the night, of his being found out as a returned transport.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
15  I was haunted by the fear that she would, sooner or later, find me out, with a black face and hands, doing the coarsest part of my work, and would exult over me and despise me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
16  For a moment, with the fear of my sister's working me before my eyes, I had a desperate idea of starting round the room in the assumed character of Mr. Pumblechook's chaise-cart.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
17  I persuaded myself that I knew he was taken; that there was something more upon my mind than a fear or a presentiment; that the fact had occurred, and I had a mysterious knowledge of it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
18  I alluded to the advantages I had derived in my first rawness and ignorance from his society, and I confessed that I feared I had but ill repaid them, and that he might have done better without me and my expectations.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
19  That Compeyson stood in mortal fear of him, neither of the two could know much better than I; and that any such man as that man had been described to be would hesitate to release himself for good from a dreaded enemy by the safe means of becoming an informer was scarcely to be imagined.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIII
20  As I could do no service there, and as I had, nearer home, that pressing reason for anxiety and fear which even her wanderings could not drive out of my mind, I decided, in the course of the night that I would return by the early morning coach, walking on a mile or so, and being taken up clear of the town.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX