FEEL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - feel in Sense and Sensibility
1  But, in return, your sister must allow me to feel no more than I profess.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
2  Here she took out her handkerchief; but Elinor did not feel very compassionate.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
3  A doubt of her regard, supposing him to feel it, need not give him more than inquietude.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
4  With such a knowledge as this, it was impossible for Elinor to feel easy on the subject.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
5  Pray, pray be composed," cried Elinor, "and do not betray what you feel to every body present.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
6  I am convinced," said Edward, "that you really feel all the delight in a fine prospect which you profess to feel.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
7  Elinor submitted to the arrangement which counteracted her wishes with less reluctance than she had expected to feel.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
8  Every body pretends to feel and tries to describe with the taste and elegance of him who first defined what picturesque beauty was.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
9  As such, however, they were treated by her with quiet civility; and by her husband with as much kindness as he could feel towards anybody beyond himself, his wife, and their child.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
10  The prospect of four thousand a-year, in addition to his present income, besides the remaining half of his own mother's fortune, warmed his heart, and made him feel capable of generosity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
11  Marianne was silent; it was impossible for her to say what she did not feel, however trivial the occasion; and upon Elinor therefore the whole task of telling lies when politeness required it, always fell.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
12  It would be impossible, I know," replied Elinor, "to convince you that a woman of seven and twenty could feel for a man of thirty-five anything near enough to love, to make him a desirable companion to her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
13  She began almost to feel a dislike of Edward; and it ended, as every feeling must end with her, by carrying back her thoughts to Willoughby, whose manners formed a contrast sufficiently striking to those of his brother elect.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
14  Because he believes many people pretend to more admiration of the beauties of nature than they really feel, and is disgusted with such pretensions, he affects greater indifference and less discrimination in viewing them himself than he possesses.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
15  The latter, though unable to speak, seemed to feel all the tenderness of this behaviour, and after some time thus spent in joint affliction, she put all the letters into Elinor's hands; and then covering her face with her handkerchief, almost screamed with agony.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
16  Most grateful did Elinor feel to Lady Middleton for observing, at this moment, "that it rained very hard," though she believed the interruption to proceed less from any attention to her, than from her ladyship's great dislike of all such inelegant subjects of raillery as delighted her husband and mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
17  A woman of seven and twenty," said Marianne, after pausing a moment, "can never hope to feel or inspire affection again, and if her home be uncomfortable, or her fortune small, I can suppose that she might bring herself to submit to the offices of a nurse, for the sake of the provision and security of a wife.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
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