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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - forge in Great Expectations
1  I'm wrong out of the forge, the kitchen, or off th meshes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
2  No; because when I come in from the forge of a night, any one can see me turning to at it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
3  He had been out early with the chaise-cart, and had called at the forge and heard the news.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
4  There was a song Joe used to hum fragments of at the forge, of which the burden was Old Clem.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
5  When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
6  Joe had got his coat and waistcoat and cravat off, and his leather apron on, and passed into the forge.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
7  There was a door in the kitchen, communicating with the forge; I unlocked and unbolted that door, and got a file from among Joe's tools.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
8  People are put in the Hulks because they murder, and because they rob, and forge, and do all sorts of bad; and they always begin by asking questions.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
9  But he was often talked at, while they were in progress, by reason of Mrs. Joe's perceiving that he was not favorable to my being taken from the forge.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
10  Once, it had seemed to me that when I should at last roll up my shirt-sleeves and go into the forge, Joe's 'prentice, I should be distinguished and happy.'
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
11  After Mr. Pumblechook had driven off, and when my sister was washing up, I stole into the forge to Joe, and remained by him until he had done for the night.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
12  As I watched them while they all stood clustering about the forge, enjoying themselves so much, I thought what terrible good sauce for a dinner my fugitive friend on the marshes was.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
13  When I offered to your sister to keep company, and to be asked in church at such times as she was willing and ready to come to the forge, I said to her, 'And bring the poor little child.'
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
14  Therefore, I was not only odd-boy about the forge, but if any neighbor happened to want an extra boy to frighten birds, or pick up stones, or do any such job, I was favored with the employment.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
15  When I was very small and timid, he gave me to understand that the Devil lived in a black corner of the forge, and that he knew the fiend very well: also that it was necessary to make up the fire, once in seven years, with a live boy, and that I might consider myself fuel.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
16  It was furnished with fresh young remembrances too, and even at the same moment I fell into much the same confused division of mind between it and the better rooms to which I was going, as I had been in so often between the forge and Miss Havisham's, and Biddy and Estella.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
17  I had believed in the best parlor as a most elegant saloon; I had believed in the front door, as a mysterious portal of the Temple of State whose solemn opening was attended with a sacrifice of roast fowls; I had believed in the kitchen as a chaste though not magnificent apartment; I had believed in the forge as the glowing road to manhood and independence.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
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