FORTUNE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - fortune in Sense and Sensibility
1  I understand she is a woman of very good fortune.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
2  One's fortune, as your mother justly says, is NOT one's own.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  Her fortune was large, and our family estate much encumbered.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
4  But the fortune, which had been so tardy in coming, was his only one twelvemonth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
5  To take three thousand pounds from the fortune of their dear little boy would be impoverishing him to the most dreadful degree.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
6  Perhaps just at present he may be undecided; the smallness of your fortune may make him hang back; his friends may all advise him against it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
7  John Dashwood was greatly astonished; but his nature was calm, not open to provocation, and he never wished to offend anybody, especially anybody of good fortune.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
8  The son, a steady respectable young man, was amply provided for by the fortune of his mother, which had been large, and half of which devolved on him on his coming of age.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
9  The prospect of four thousand a-year, in addition to his present income, besides the remaining half of his own mother's fortune, warmed his heart, and made him feel capable of generosity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
10  But so it ought to be; they are people of large fortune, they are related to you, and every civility and accommodation that can serve to make your situation pleasant might be reasonably expected.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
11  Their mother had nothing, and their father only seven thousand pounds in his own disposal; for the remaining moiety of his first wife's fortune was also secured to her child, and he had only a life-interest in it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
12  Her legal allowance was not adequate to her fortune, nor sufficient for her comfortable maintenance, and I learnt from my brother that the power of receiving it had been made over some months before to another person.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
13  To him therefore the succession to the Norland estate was not so really important as to his sisters; for their fortune, independent of what might arise to them from their father's inheriting that property, could be but small.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
14  It was contrary to every doctrine of hers that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition; and that Elinor's merit should not be acknowledged by every one who knew her, was to her comprehension impossible.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
15  If in the supposition of his seeking to marry herself, his difficulties from his mother had seemed great, how much greater were they now likely to be, when the object of his engagement was undoubtedly inferior in connections, and probably inferior in fortune to herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
16  Some mothers might have encouraged the intimacy from motives of interest, for Edward Ferrars was the eldest son of a man who had died very rich; and some might have repressed it from motives of prudence, for, except a trifling sum, the whole of his fortune depended on the will of his mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
17  A woman of seven and twenty," said Marianne, after pausing a moment, "can never hope to feel or inspire affection again, and if her home be uncomfortable, or her fortune small, I can suppose that she might bring herself to submit to the offices of a nurse, for the sake of the provision and security of a wife.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
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