FRIEND in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - friend in Sense and Sensibility
1  I was last month at my friend Elliott's, near Dartford.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
2  An effort even yet lighter might have made her their friend.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
3  Elinor saw, with great uneasiness the low spirits of her friend.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
4  On the contrary, every friend must be made still more her friend by them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
5  My dear friend," cried Lucy, as soon as they were by themselves, "I come to talk to you of my happiness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
6  But tomorrow I think I shall certainly be able to call in Berkeley Street, and be introduced to your friend Mrs. Jennings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
7  Their good friend saw that Marianne was unhappy, and felt that every thing was due to her which might make her at all less so.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
8  She then went away, walking on tiptoe out of the room, as if she supposed her young friend's affliction could be increased by noise.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
9  My friend Lord Courtland came to me the other day on purpose to ask my advice, and laid before me three different plans of Bonomi's.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
10  Again he stopped to recover himself; and Elinor spoke her feelings in an exclamation of tender concern, at the fate of his unfortunate friend.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
11  They would see, he said, only one gentleman there besides himself; a particular friend who was staying at the park, but who was neither very young nor very gay.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
12  Colonel Brandon, the friend of Sir John, seemed no more adapted by resemblance of manner to be his friend, than Lady Middleton was to be his wife, or Mrs. Jennings to be Lady Middleton's mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
13  Mrs. Taylor told me of it half an hour ago, and she was told it by a particular friend of Miss Grey herself, else I am sure I should not have believed it; and I was almost ready to sink as it was.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
14  She would not be frightened from paying him those attentions which, as a friend and almost a relation, were his due, by the observant eyes of Lucy, though she soon perceived them to be narrowly watching her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
15  Lady Middleton, though in the middle of a rubber, on being informed that Marianne was unwell, was too polite to object for a moment to her wish of going away, and making over her cards to a friend, they departed as soon the carriage could be found.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
16  I have heard," said he, with great compassion, "of the injustice your friend Mr. Ferrars has suffered from his family; for if I understand the matter right, he has been entirely cast off by them for persevering in his engagement with a very deserving young woman.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39
17  Having now said enough to make his poverty clear, and to do away the necessity of buying a pair of ear-rings for each of his sisters, in his next visit at Gray's his thoughts took a cheerfuller turn, and he began to congratulate Elinor on having such a friend as Mrs. Jennings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.