FRIENDS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - friends in Great Expectations
1  She lived, and found powerful friends.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
2  "They are your friends," said Miss Havisham.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
3  And all friends is no backerder, if not no forarder.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
4  Which dear old Pip, old chap," said Joe, "you and me was ever friends.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
5  I'd sell all the friends I ever had for one, and think it a blessed good bargain.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
6  He further gave me leave to accompany the prisoner to London; but declined to accord that grace to my two friends.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
7  I noticed, too, that several rings and seals hung at his watch-chain, as if he were quite laden with remembrances of departed friends.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
8  You know, Pip," replied Joe, "as you and me were ever friends, and it were looked for'ard to betwixt us, as being calc'lated to lead to larks.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
9  You and me is not two figures to be together in London; nor yet anywheres else but what is private, and beknown, and understood among friends.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
10  I felt mortified to be of so little use in the boat; but, there were few better oarsmen than my two friends, and they rowed with a steady stroke that was to last all day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
11  Which it were," said Joe, "that how you might be amongst strangers, and that how you and me having been ever friends, a wisit at such a moment might not prove unacceptabobble.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
12  I was always treated as if I had insisted on being born in opposition to the dictates of reason, religion, and morality, and against the dissuading arguments of my best friends.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
13  You know, Pip," said Joe, solemnly, with his last bite in his cheek, and speaking in a confidential voice, as if we two were quite alone, "you and me is always friends, and I'd be the last to tell upon you, any time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
14  My guardian was in his room, washing his hands with his scented soap, when I went into the office from Walworth; and he called me to him, and gave me the invitation for myself and friends which Wemmick had prepared me to receive.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
15  It was visiting time when Wemmick took me in, and a potman was going his rounds with beer; and the prisoners, behind bars in yards, were buying beer, and talking to friends; and a frowzy, ugly, disorderly, depressing scene it was.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
16  When we had come out again, and had got rid of the boys who had been put into great spirits by the expectation of seeing me publicly tortured, and who were much disappointed to find that my friends were merely rallying round me, we went back to Pumblechook's.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
17  When I and my friends repaired to him at six o'clock next day, he seemed to have been engaged on a case of a darker complexion than usual, for we found him with his head butted into this closet, not only washing his hands, but laving his face and gargling his throat.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
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