GENERALIZING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - generalizing in Great Expectations
1  The interest of the impending pursuit not only absorbed the general attention, but even made my sister liberal.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
2  But in the general tumbling up of the family, his tumbling out in life somewhere, was a thing to transact itself somehow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
3  She was not a good-looking woman, my sister; and I had a general impression that she must have made Joe Gargery marry her by hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
4  Morning made a considerable difference in my general prospect of Life, and brightened it so much that it scarcely seemed the same.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
5  When I was younger, I had had a general belief that if he had jiggered me personally, he would have done it with a sharp and twisted hook.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
6  To have Provis for an upper lodger is quite a godsend to Mrs. Whimple," said Herbert, "for of course people in general won't stand that noise.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI
7  There was something wonderfully hopeful about his general air, and something that at the same time whispered to me he would never be very successful or rich.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
8  And when he and I were left alone together, he sat with an air upon him of general lying by in consequence of information he possessed, that really was too much for me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
9  As I am now generalizing a period of my life with the object of clearing my way before me, I can scarcely do so better than by at once completing the description of our usual manners and customs at Barnard's Inn.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
10  Still, Mrs. Pocket was in general the object of a queer sort of respectful pity, because she had not married a title; while Mr. Pocket was the object of a queer sort of forgiving reproach, because he had never got one.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
11  At first with such discourse, and afterwards with conversation of a more general nature, did Mr. Wemmick and I beguile the time and the road, until he gave me to understand that we had arrived in the district of Walworth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
12  I forget in detail what they were, but I have a general recollection that he was to begin with reviving the Drama, and to end with crushing it; inasmuch as his decease would leave it utterly bereft and without a chance or hope.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXI
13  So, when we had walked home and had had tea, I took Biddy into our little garden by the side of the lane, and, after throwing out in a general way for the elevation of her spirits, that I should never forget her, said I had a favor to ask of her.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
14  I insensibly fall into a general mention of these journeys as numerous, because it was at once settled that I should return every alternate day at noon for these purposes, and because I am now going to sum up a period of at least eight or ten months.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
15  Mr. Pumblechook wore corduroys, and so did his shopman; and somehow, there was a general air and flavor about the corduroys, so much in the nature of seeds, and a general air and flavor about the seeds, so much in the nature of corduroys, that I hardly knew which was which.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  They were all displayed in that chamber of the Castle into which I had been first inducted, and which served, not only as the general sitting-room but as the kitchen too, if I might judge from a saucepan on the hob, and a brazen bijou over the fireplace designed for the suspension of a roasting-jack.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
17  At once ferocious and maudlin, I was made to murder my uncle with no extenuating circumstances whatever; Millwood put me down in argument, on every occasion; it became sheer monomania in my master's daughter to care a button for me; and all I can say for my gasping and procrastinating conduct on the fatal morning, is, that it was worthy of the general feebleness of my character.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
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