GREAT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - great in Great Expectations
1  His spirit inspired me with great respect.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
2  A fearful man, all in coarse gray, with a great iron on his leg.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
3  That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
4  I think I would have gone through a great deal to kiss her cheek.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
5  This change had a great influence in bringing Camilla's chemistry to a sudden end.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
6  I am a keeping that young man from harming of you at the present moment, with great difficulty.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
7  But, he was on his feet directly, and after sponging himself with a great show of dexterity began squaring again.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
8  It was as if I had to make up my mind to leap from the top of a high house, or plunge into a great depth of water.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
9  One night I was sitting in the chimney corner with my slate, expending great efforts on the production of a letter to Joe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
10  The torches we carried dropped great blotches of fire upon the track, and I could see those, too, lying smoking and flaring.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
11  At this dismal intelligence, I twisted the only button on my waistcoat round and round, and looked in great depression at the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
12  Within a quarter of an hour we came to Miss Havisham's house, which was of old brick, and dismal, and had a great many iron bars to it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
13  Never questioning for a moment that the house was now empty, I looked in at another window, and found myself, to my great surprise, exchanging a broad stare with a pale young gentleman with red eyelids and light hair.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
14  And yet this man was dressed in coarse gray, too, and had a great iron on his leg, and was lame, and hoarse, and cold, and was everything that the other man was; except that he had not the same face, and had a flat broad-brimmed low-crowned felt hat on.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
15  When we had come out again, and had got rid of the boys who had been put into great spirits by the expectation of seeing me publicly tortured, and who were much disappointed to find that my friends were merely rallying round me, we went back to Pumblechook's.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
16  Through all my punishments, disgraces, fasts, and vigils, and other penitential performances, I had nursed this assurance; and to my communing so much with it, in a solitary and unprotected way, I in great part refer the fact that I was morally timid and very sensitive.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
17  But presently I looked over my shoulder, and saw him going on again towards the river, still hugging himself in both arms, and picking his way with his sore feet among the great stones dropped into the marshes here and there, for stepping-places when the rains were heavy or the tide was in.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
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