HANDS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - hands in Great Expectations
1  I looked at him eagerly when he looked at me, and slightly moved my hands and shook my head.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
2  I took the opportunity of being alone in the courtyard to look at my coarse hands and my common boots.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
3  Afterwards she kept her hands there for a little while, and slowly took them away as if they were heavy.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
4  Some bright jewels sparkled on her neck and on her hands, and some other jewels lay sparkling on the table.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
5  I had never thought of being ashamed of my hands before; but I began to consider them a very indifferent pair.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  She had her back towards me, and held her pretty brown hair spread out in her two hands, and never looked round, and passed out of my view directly.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
7  She gave me a triumphant glance in passing me, as if she rejoiced that my hands were so coarse and my boots were so thick, and she opened the gate, and stood holding it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  The terrors that had assailed me whenever Mrs. Joe had gone near the pantry, or out of the room, were only to be equalled by the remorse with which my mind dwelt on what my hands had done.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
9  Always holding tight by the leg of the table with my hands and feet, I saw the miserable creature finger his glass playfully, take it up, smile, throw his head back, and drink the brandy off.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
10  She was most noticeable, I thought, in respect of her extremities; for, her hair always wanted brushing, her hands always wanted washing, and her shoes always wanted mending and pulling up at heel.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
11  It may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small, and its rocking-horse stands as many hands high, according to scale, as a big-boned Irish hunter.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
12  And then they stood about, as soldiers do; now, with their hands loosely clasped before them; now, resting a knee or a shoulder; now, easing a belt or a pouch; now, opening the door to spit stiffly over their high stocks, out into the yard.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
13  The other, always working and working his dry lips and turning his eyes restlessly about him far and near, did at last turn them for a moment on the speaker, with the words, "You are not much to look at," and with a half-taunting glance at the bound hands.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
14  As I saw him go, picking his way among the nettles, and among the brambles that bound the green mounds, he looked in my young eyes as if he were eluding the hands of the dead people, stretching up cautiously out of their graves, to get a twist upon his ankle and pull him in.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
15  When I got up to my little room and said my prayers, I did not forget Joe's recommendation, and yet my young mind was in that disturbed and unthankful state, that I thought long after I laid me down, how common Estella would consider Joe, a mere blacksmith; how thick his boots, and how coarse his hands.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
16  For you do not know that Uncle Pumblechook, being sensible that for anything we can tell, this boy's fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham's, has offered to take him into town to-night in his own chaise-cart, and to keep him to-night, and to take him with his own hands to Miss Havisham's to-morrow morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
17  I was fully old enough now to be apprenticed to Joe; and when Joe sat with the poker on his knees thoughtfully raking out the ashes between the lower bars, my sister would so distinctly construe that innocent action into opposition on his part, that she would dive at him, take the poker out of his hands, shake him, and put it away.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
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