HAPPY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - happy in Sense and Sensibility
1  I have been too much at my ease, too happy, too frank.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
2  Extend it a little farther, and it will make me happy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
3  Marianne rose the next morning with recovered spirits and happy looks.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
4  Elinor has not my feelings, and therefore she may overlook it, and be happy with him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
5  You are in a melancholy humour, and fancy that any one unlike yourself must be happy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
6  I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
7  I wish as well as every body else to be perfectly happy; but, like every body else it must be in my own way.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
8  It was impossible for any one to be more thoroughly good-natured, or more determined to be happy than Mrs. Palmer.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
9  They were cheered by the joy of the servants on their arrival, and each for the sake of the others resolved to appear happy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
10  Mrs. Jennings, Lady Middleton's mother, was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
11  The friendliness of his disposition made him happy in accommodating those, whose situation might be considered, in comparison with the past, as unfortunate.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
12  They were all in high spirits and good humour, eager to be happy, and determined to submit to the greatest inconveniences and hardships rather than be otherwise.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
13  They were three days on their journey, and Marianne's behaviour as they travelled was a happy specimen of what future complaisance and companionableness to Mrs. Jennings might be expected to be.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
14  Mrs. Palmer, on the contrary, who was strongly endowed by nature with a turn for being uniformly civil and happy, was hardly seated before her admiration of the parlour and every thing in it burst forth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
15  Even Lady Middleton took the trouble of being delighted, which was putting herself rather out of her way; and as for the Miss Steeles, especially Lucy, they had never been so happy in their lives as this intelligence made them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
16  Elinor placed all that was astonishing in this way of acting to his mother's account; and it was happy for her that he had a mother whose character was so imperfectly known to her, as to be the general excuse for every thing strange on the part of her son.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
17  When Sir John returned, he joined most heartily in the general regret on so unfortunate an event; concluding however by observing, that as they were all got together, they must do something by way of being happy; and after some consultation it was agreed, that although happiness could only be enjoyed at Whitwell, they might procure a tolerable composure of mind by driving about the country.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
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