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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - home in Great Expectations
1  And then he took us home and hammered us.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
2  But now I was frightened again, and ran home without stopping.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
3  When I saw him turning, I set my face towards home, and made the best use of my legs.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
4  I went straight to Mr. Pumblechook's, and was immensely relieved to find him not at home.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
5  When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
6  As I was sleepy before we were far away from the prison-ship, Joe took me on his back again and carried me home.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
7  When I reached home, my sister was very curious to know all about Miss Havisham's, and asked a number of questions.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
8  Meanwhile, councils went on in the kitchen at home, fraught with almost insupportable aggravation to my exasperated spirit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
9  When I got home at night, and delivered this message for Joe, my sister "went on the Rampage," in a more alarming degree than at any previous period.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
10  Then I put the fastenings as I had found them, opened the door at which I had entered when I ran home last night, shut it, and ran for the misty marshes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
11  I had received strict orders from my sister to call for him at the Three Jolly Bargemen, that evening, on my way from school, and bring him home at my peril.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
12  Not satisfied with a dry cleaning, she took to a pail and scrubbing-brush, and cleaned us out of house and home, so that we stood shivering in the back-yard.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
13  I was very much afraid of him again, now that he had worked himself into this fierce hurry, and I was likewise very much afraid of keeping away from home any longer.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
14  For some days, I even kept close at home, and looked out at the kitchen door with the greatest caution and trepidation before going on an errand, lest the officers of the County Jail should pounce upon me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
15  So, we had our slices served out, as if we were two thousand troops on a forced march instead of a man and boy at home; and we took gulps of milk and water, with apologetic countenances, from a jug on the dresser.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
16  On the way home, if I had been in a humor for talking, the talk must have been all on my side, for Mr. Wopsle parted from us at the door of the Jolly Bargemen, and Joe went all the way home with his mouth wide open, to rinse the rum out with as much air as possible.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
17  What with the birthday visitors, and what with the cards, and what with the fight, my stay had lasted so long, that when I neared home the light on the spit of sand off the point on the marshes was gleaming against a black night-sky, and Joe's furnace was flinging a path of fire across the road.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
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