HOW in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - how in Great Expectations
1  No matter how unreasonable the terror, so that it be terror.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
2  I didn't know how I had done it, but I had no doubt I had murdered him somehow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
3  Nor, how I passed and repassed the gate many times before I could make up my mind to ring.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
4  Imagine one selected day struck out of it, and think how different its course would have been.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
5  We never should have got leave to go, I am sure, but for Mrs. Joe's curiosity to know all about it and how it ended.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
6  When I said that I only came to see how Miss Havisham was, Sarah evidently deliberated whether or no she should send me about my business.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
7  Nor, how I debated whether I should go away without ringing; nor, how I should undoubtedly have gone, if my time had been my own, to come back.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
8  You fail, or you go from my words in any partickler, no matter how small it is, and your heart and your liver shall be tore out, roasted, and ate.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
9  As I was saying, Pip, it were my intentions to have had it cut over him; but poetry costs money, cut it how you will, small or large, and it were not done.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
10  How much of my ungracious condition of mind may have been my own fault, how much Miss Havisham's, how much my sister's, is now of no moment to me or to any one.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
11  And then I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
12  We were noticing this, and saying how that the mist rose with a change of wind from a certain quarter of our marshes, when we came upon a man, slouching under the lee of the turnpike house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
13  I thought how Joe and my sister were then sitting in the kitchen, and how I had come up to bed from the kitchen, and how Miss Havisham and Estella never sat in a kitchen, but were far above the level of such common doings.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
14  When I got up to my little room and said my prayers, I did not forget Joe's recommendation, and yet my young mind was in that disturbed and unthankful state, that I thought long after I laid me down, how common Estella would consider Joe, a mere blacksmith; how thick his boots, and how coarse his hands.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
15  I remember that at a later period of my "time," I used to stand about the churchyard on Sunday evenings when night was falling, comparing my own perspective with the windy marsh view, and making out some likeness between them by thinking how flat and low both were, and how on both there came an unknown way and a dark mist and then the sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
16  As I never assisted at any other representation of George Barnwell, I don't know how long it may usually take; but I know very well that it took until half-past nine o clock that night, and that when Mr. Wopsle got into Newgate, I thought he never would go to the scaffold, he became so much slower than at any former period of his disgraceful career.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
17  It is not possible to know how far the influence of any amiable honest-hearted duty-doing man flies out into the world; but it is very possible to know how it has touched one's self in going by, and I know right well that any good that intermixed itself with my apprenticeship came of plain contented Joe, and not of restlessly aspiring discontented me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
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