IRON in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - iron in Great Expectations
1  A fearful man, all in coarse gray, with a great iron on his leg.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
2  Further, one of those two was already retaken, and had not freed himself of his iron.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
3  Now, Joe, examining this iron with a smith's eye, declared it to have been filed asunder some time ago.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
4  If I could be less affectionate and sensitive, I should have a better digestion and an iron set of nerves.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
5  The hue and cry going off to the Hulks, and people coming thence to examine the iron, Joe's opinion was corroborated.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
6  The sound of her iron shoes upon the hard road was quite musical, as she came along at a much brisker trot than usual.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
7  Within a quarter of an hour we came to Miss Havisham's house, which was of old brick, and dismal, and had a great many iron bars to it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  It was a song that imitated the measure of beating upon iron, and was a mere lyrical excuse for the introduction of Old Clem's respected name.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
9  At length, as I was looking out at the iron gate of Bartholomew Close into Little Britain, I saw Mr. Jaggers coming across the road towards me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
10  Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
11  All this time, I was getting on towards the river; but however fast I went, I couldn't warm my feet, to which the damp cold seemed riveted, as the iron was riveted to the leg of the man I was running to meet.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
12  Then, as the marsh winds made the fire glow and flare, I thought I heard the voice outside, of the man with the iron on his leg who had sworn me to secrecy, declaring that he couldn't and wouldn't starve until to-morrow, but must be fed now.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
13  But he was down on the rank wet grass, filing at his iron like a madman, and not minding me or minding his own leg, which had an old chafe upon it and was bloody, but which he handled as roughly as if it had no more feeling in it than the file.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
14  And yet this man was dressed in coarse gray, too, and had a great iron on his leg, and was lame, and hoarse, and cold, and was everything that the other man was; except that he had not the same face, and had a flat broad-brimmed low-crowned felt hat on.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
15  When I first went into it, and, rather oppressed by its gloom, stood near the door looking about me, I saw her pass among the extinguished fires, and ascend some light iron stairs, and go out by a gallery high overhead, as if she were going out into the sky.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  He was a prosperous old bachelor, and his open window looked into a prosperous little garden and orchard, and there was a prosperous iron safe let into the wall at the side of his fireplace, and I did not doubt that heaps of his prosperity were put away in it in bags.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
17  The Aged prepared such a hay-stack of buttered toast, that I could scarcely see him over it as it simmered on an iron stand hooked on to the top-bar; while Miss Skiffins brewed such a jorum of tea, that the pig in the back premises became strongly excited, and repeatedly expressed his desire to participate in the entertainment.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
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