KITCHEN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - kitchen in Great Expectations
1  I fully expected to find a Constable in the kitchen, waiting to take me up.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
2  Consequently, I said as little as I could, and had my face shoved against the kitchen wall.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
3  When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
4  With that, he called to his men, who came trooping into the kitchen one after another, and piled their arms in a corner.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
5  The sergeant and I were in the kitchen when Mrs. Joe stood staring; at which crisis I partially recovered the use of my senses.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
6  There was a door in the kitchen, communicating with the forge; I unlocked and unbolted that door, and got a file from among Joe's tools.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
7  But, Uncle Pumblechook, who was omnipotent in that kitchen, wouldn't hear the word, wouldn't hear of the subject, imperiously waved it all away with his hand, and asked for hot gin and water.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
8  We got a chair out, ready for Mrs. Joe's alighting, and stirred up the fire that they might see a bright window, and took a final survey of the kitchen that nothing might be out of its place.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
9  We dined on these occasions in the kitchen, and adjourned, for the nuts and oranges and apples to the parlor; which was a change very like Joe's change from his working-clothes to his Sunday dress.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
10  In order, however, that our superior position might not be compromised thereby, a money-box was kept on the kitchen mantel-shelf, in to which it was publicly made known that all my earnings were dropped.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
11  By that time, I was staggering on the kitchen floor like a little drunkard, through having been newly set upon my feet, and through having been fast asleep, and through waking in the heat and lights and noise of tongues.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
12  I thought how Joe and my sister were then sitting in the kitchen, and how I had come up to bed from the kitchen, and how Miss Havisham and Estella never sat in a kitchen, but were far above the level of such common doings.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
13  Mrs. Joe was soon landed, and Uncle Pumblechook was soon down too, covering the mare with a cloth, and we were soon all in the kitchen, carrying so much cold air in with us that it seemed to drive all the heat out of the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
14  And I soon found myself getting heavily bumped from behind in the nape of the neck and the small of the back, and having my face ignominiously shoved against the kitchen wall, because I did not answer those questions at sufficient length.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
15  In his lay capacity, he persisted in sitting down in the damp to such an insane extent, that when his coat was taken off to be dried at the kitchen fire, the circumstantial evidence on his trousers would have hanged him, if it had been a capital offence.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
16  Joe, who had ventured into the kitchen after me as the dustpan had retired before us, drew the back of his hand across his nose with a conciliatory air, when Mrs. Joe darted a look at him, and, when her eyes were withdrawn, secretly crossed his two forefingers, and exhibited them to me, as our token that Mrs. Joe was in a cross temper.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
17  It being Saturday night, I found the landlord looking rather grimly at these records; but as my business was with Joe and not with him, I merely wished him good evening, and passed into the common room at the end of the passage, where there was a bright large kitchen fire, and where Joe was smoking his pipe in company with Mr. Wopsle and a stranger.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
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