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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - knowledge in Sense and Sensibility
1  With such a knowledge as this, it was impossible for Elinor to feel easy on the subject.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
2  Nothing could do away the knowledge of what the latter had suffered through his means, nor remove the guilt of his conduct towards Eliza.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
3  She would not even admit it to have been natural; and Elinor left her to be convinced that it was so, by that which only could convince her, a better knowledge of mankind.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
4  His want of spirits, of openness, and of consistency, were most usually attributed to his want of independence, and his better knowledge of Mrs. Ferrars's disposition and designs.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
5  The third day succeeding their knowledge of the particulars, was so fine, so beautiful a Sunday as to draw many to Kensington Gardens, though it was only the second week in March.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
6  Let me be able to fancy that a better knowledge of my heart, and of my present feelings, will draw from her a more spontaneous, more natural, more gentle, less dignified, forgiveness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44
7  Mrs. Dashwood was sorry for what she had said; but it gave Elinor pleasure, as it produced a reply from Marianne so expressive of confidence in Willoughby and knowledge of his intentions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
8  I was very unwilling to enter into it, as you may imagine, without the knowledge and approbation of his mother; but I was too young, and loved him too well, to be so prudent as I ought to have been.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
9  Mrs. Jennings had been anxious to see Colonel Brandon well married, ever since her connection with Sir John first brought him to her knowledge; and she was always anxious to get a good husband for every pretty girl.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
10  She was very far from wishing to dwell on her own feelings, or to represent herself as suffering much, any otherwise than as the self-command she had practised since her first knowledge of Edward's engagement, might suggest a hint of what was practicable to Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
11  Elinor, unable herself to determine whether it were better for Marianne to be in London or at Barton, offered no counsel of her own except of patience till their mother's wishes could be known; and at length she obtained her sister's consent to wait for that knowledge.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
12  But so little interest had he taken in the matter, that he owed all his knowledge of the house, garden, and glebe, extent of the parish, condition of the land, and rate of the tithes, to Elinor herself, who had heard so much of it from Colonel Brandon, and heard it with so much attention, as to be entirely mistress of the subject.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
13  To Mrs. Jennings, to the Middletons, he has been long and intimately known; they equally love and respect him; and even my own knowledge of him, though lately acquired, is very considerable; and so highly do I value and esteem him, that if Marianne can be happy with him, I shall be as ready as yourself to think our connection the greatest blessing to us in the world.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45
14  Such was her parting concern; for after this, she had time only to pay her farewell compliments to Mrs. Jennings, before her company was claimed by Mrs. Richardson; and Elinor was left in possession of knowledge which might feed her powers of reflection some time, though she had learnt very little more than what had been already foreseen and foreplanned in her own mind.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38