LADY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - lady in Great Expectations
1  "Thinking is easy enough," said the grave lady.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
2  Whether I should have made out this object so soon if there had been no fine lady sitting at it, I cannot say.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
3  This lady's name was Mrs. Coiler, and I had the honor of taking her down to dinner on the day of my installation.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
4  Abroad," said Miss Havisham; "educating for a lady; far out of reach; prettier than ever; admired by all who see her.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
5  The lady whom I had never seen before, lifted up her eyes and looked archly at me, and then I saw that the eyes were Estella's eyes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
6  The voice returned, "Quite right," and the window was shut again, and a young lady came across the court-yard, with keys in her hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
7  But prominent in it was a draped table with a gilded looking-glass, and that I made out at first sight to be a fine lady's dressing-table.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  In an arm-chair, with an elbow resting on the table and her head leaning on that hand, sat the strangest lady I have ever seen, or shall ever see.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
9  Sitting near her, with the white shoe, that had never been worn, in her hand, and her head bent as she looked at it, was an elegant lady whom I had never seen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
10  When he had once more laughed heartily, he became meek again, and told me that the moment he began to realize Capital, it was his intention to marry this young lady.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
11  So successful a watch and ward had been established over the young lady by this judicious parent, that she had grown up highly ornamental, but perfectly helpless and useless.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
12  Having looked at this extinct conflagration and shaken his head, he took my order; which, proving to be merely, "Some tea for the lady," sent him out of the room in a very low state of mind.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIII
13  For such reasons, I was very glad when ten o'clock came and we started for Miss Havisham's; though I was not at all at my ease regarding the manner in which I should acquit myself under that lady's roof.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
14  Mr. and Mrs. Pocket had a toady neighbor; a widow lady of that highly sympathetic nature that she agreed with everybody, blessed everybody, and shed smiles and tears on everybody, according to circumstances.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
15  To stand in the dark in a mysterious passage of an unknown house, bawling Estella to a scornful young lady neither visible nor responsive, and feeling it a dreadful liberty so to roar out her name, was almost as bad as playing to order.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  I judged him to be a bachelor from the frayed condition of his linen, and he appeared to have sustained a good many bereavements; for he wore at least four mourning rings, besides a brooch representing a lady and a weeping willow at a tomb with an urn on it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
17  Mr. Camilla interposing, as Mrs. Camilla laid her hand upon her heaving bosom, that lady assumed an unnatural fortitude of manner which I supposed to be expressive of an intention to drop and choke when out of view, and kissing her hand to Miss Havisham, was escorted forth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
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