LEAVES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - leaves in Sense and Sensibility
1  The reason alleged was their determined resolution of not leaving their mother at that time of the year.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
2  At seven o'clock, leaving Marianne still sweetly asleep, she joined Mrs. Jennings in the drawing-room to tea.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
3  She had heard nothing of him since her leaving London, nothing new of his plans, nothing certain even of his present abode.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
4  Soon after this, upon Elinor's leaving the room, "Mama," said Marianne, "I have an alarm on the subject of illness which I cannot conceal from you."
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
5  From a reverie of this kind, as she sat at her drawing-table, she was roused one morning, soon after Edward's leaving them, by the arrival of company.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
6  One morning, about a week after his leaving the country, Marianne was prevailed on to join her sisters in their usual walk, instead of wandering away by herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
7  The shortness of his visit, the steadiness of his purpose in leaving them, originated in the same fettered inclination, the same inevitable necessity of temporizing with his mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
8  Short was the time, however, in which that fear could affect her, for within half an hour after Willoughby's leaving the house, she was again called down stairs by the sound of another carriage.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45
9  If this open weather holds much longer," said Mrs. Jennings, when they met at breakfast the following morning, "Sir John will not like leaving Barton next week; 'tis a sad thing for sportsmen to lose a day's pleasure.'
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
10  Recollecting, soon afterwards, that he was probably dividing Elinor from her sister, he put an end to his visit, receiving from her again the same grateful acknowledgments, and leaving her full of compassion and esteem for him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
11  The morning was chiefly spent in leaving cards at the houses of Mrs. Jennings's acquaintance to inform them of her being in town; and Marianne was all the time busy in observing the direction of the wind, watching the variations of the sky and imagining an alteration in the air.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
12  It was forwarded to me from Delaford, and I received it on the very morning of our intended party to Whitwell; and this was the reason of my leaving Barton so suddenly, which I am sure must at the time have appeared strange to every body, and which I believe gave offence to some.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
13  By that time, Marianne was rather better, and her mother leaving her to the care of Margaret and the maid, returned to Elinor, who, though still much disordered, had so far recovered the use of her reason and voice as to be just beginning an inquiry of Thomas, as to the source of his intelligence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
14  she urged him so strongly to remain, that he, who was gratifying the first wish of his own heart by a compliance, could not long even affect to demur; especially as Mrs. Jennings's entreaty was warmly seconded by Mr. Palmer, who seemed to feel a relief to himself, in leaving behind him a person so well able to assist or advise Miss Dashwood in any emergence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43