LONG in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - long in Great Expectations
1  It was at a distance towards the east, but it was long and loud.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
2  For there had reached us on the wings of the wind and rain, a long shout.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
3  If it warn't for me you'd have been to the churchyard long ago, and stayed there.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
4  No brewing was going on in it, and none seemed to have gone on for a long long time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
5  I thought it a strange thing then, and I thought it a stranger thing long afterwards.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  The passage was a long one, and seemed to pervade the whole square basement of the Manor House.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
7  And she had a long white veil dependent from her hair, and she had bridal flowers in her hair, but her hair was white.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  It was then I began to understand that everything in the room had stopped, like the watch and the clock, a long time ago.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
9  I think it must have been a full year after our hunt upon the marshes, for it was a long time after, and it was winter and a hard frost.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
10  But I saw that everything within my view which ought to be white, had been white long ago, and had lost its lustre and was faded and yellow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
11  There was a bar at the Jolly Bargemen, with some alarmingly long chalk scores in it on the wall at the side of the door, which seemed to me to be never paid off.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
12  My state of mind, as I have described it, began before I was up in the morning, and lasted long after the subject had died out, and had ceased to be mentioned saving on exceptional occasions.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
13  Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
14  Without this arrest of everything, this standing still of all the pale decayed objects, not even the withered bridal dress on the collapsed form could have looked so like grave-clothes, or the long veil so like a shroud.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
15  The marshes were just a long black horizontal line then, as I stopped to look after him; and the river was just another horizontal line, not nearly so broad nor yet so black; and the sky was just a row of long angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
16  When I got up to my little room and said my prayers, I did not forget Joe's recommendation, and yet my young mind was in that disturbed and unthankful state, that I thought long after I laid me down, how common Estella would consider Joe, a mere blacksmith; how thick his boots, and how coarse his hands.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
17  It opened to the ground, and looked into a most miserable corner of the neglected garden, upon a rank ruin of cabbage-stalks, and one box-tree that had been clipped round long ago, like a pudding, and had a new growth at the top of it, out of shape and of a different color, as if that part of the pudding had stuck to the saucepan and got burnt.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
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