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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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1  Come nearer; let me look at you.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
2  "Call Estella," she repeated, flashing a look at me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
3  Let him have something to eat, and let him roam and look about him while he eats.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
4  "And I ain't a master-mind," Joe resumed, when he had unfixed his look, and got back to his whisker.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
5  I took the opportunity of being alone in the courtyard to look at my coarse hands and my common boots.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  I stopped, fearing I might say too much, or had already said it, and we took another look at each other.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
7  The bread and meat were acceptable, and the beer was warming and tingling, and I was soon in spirits to look about me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  She uttered the word with an eager look, and with strong emphasis, and with a weird smile that had a kind of boast in it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
9  When he came to the low church wall, he got over it, like a man whose legs were numbed and stiff, and then turned round to look for me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
10  The other convict was livid to look at, and, in addition to the old bruised left side of his face, seemed to be bruised and torn all over.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
11  It was not at all expressed to me that he even comprehended my intention, for he gave me a look that I did not understand, and it all passed in a moment.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
12  This was always followed by Collins's Ode on the Passions, wherein I particularly venerated Mr. Wopsle as Revenge throwing his blood-stained sword in thunder down, and taking the War-denouncing trumpet with a withering look.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
13  The other, with an effort at a scornful smile, which could not, however, collect the nervous working of his mouth into any set expression, looked at the soldiers, and looked about at the marshes and at the sky, but certainly did not look at the speaker.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
14  The other, always working and working his dry lips and turning his eyes restlessly about him far and near, did at last turn them for a moment on the speaker, with the words, "You are not much to look at," and with a half-taunting glance at the bound hands.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
15  The marshes were just a long black horizontal line then, as I stopped to look after him; and the river was just another horizontal line, not nearly so broad nor yet so black; and the sky was just a row of long angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
16  I was nearly going away without the pie, but I was tempted to mount upon a shelf, to look what it was that was put away so carefully in a covered earthen ware dish in a corner, and I found it was the pie, and I took it in the hope that it was not intended for early use, and would not be missed for some time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
17  Joe, who had ventured into the kitchen after me as the dustpan had retired before us, drew the back of his hand across his nose with a conciliatory air, when Mrs. Joe darted a look at him, and, when her eyes were withdrawn, secretly crossed his two forefingers, and exhibited them to me, as our token that Mrs. Joe was in a cross temper.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
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