MARRIAGE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - marriage in Sense and Sensibility
1  In my eyes it would be no marriage at all, but that would be nothing.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
2  By his own marriage, likewise, which happened soon afterwards, he added to his wealth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
3  By a former marriage, Mr. Henry Dashwood had one son: by his present lady, three daughters.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
4  You mean," answered Elinor, with forced calmness, "Mr. Willoughby's marriage with Miss Grey.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
5  They had in fact nothing to wish for, but the marriage of Colonel Brandon and Marianne, and rather better pasturage for their cows.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
6  The rest of Mrs. Palmer's sympathy was shewn in procuring all the particulars in her power of the approaching marriage, and communicating them to Elinor.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
7  She could easily conceive that marriage might not be immediately in their power; for though Willoughby was independent, there was no reason to believe him rich.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
8  No sooner did she perceive any symptom of love in his behaviour to Elinor, than she considered their serious attachment as certain, and looked forward to their marriage as rapidly approaching.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
9  Their fates, their fortunes, cannot be the same; and had the natural sweet disposition of the one been guarded by a firmer mind, or a happier marriage, she might have been all that you will live to see the other be.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
10  Elinor's marriage divided her as little from her family as could well be contrived, without rendering the cottage at Barton entirely useless, for her mother and sisters spent much more than half their time with her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
11  She could hardly determine what her own expectation of its event really was; though she earnestly tried to drive away the notion of its being possible to end otherwise at last, than in the marriage of Edward and Lucy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
12  Her mother too, in whose mind not one speculative thought of their marriage had been raised, by his prospect of riches, was led before the end of a week to hope and expect it; and secretly to congratulate herself on having gained two such sons-in-law as Edward and Willoughby.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
13  Elinor tried very seriously to convince him that there was no likelihood of her marrying Colonel Brandon; but it was an expectation of too much pleasure to himself to be relinquished, and he was really resolved on seeking an intimacy with that gentleman, and promoting the marriage by every possible attention.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
14  Willoughby could not hear of her marriage without a pang; and his punishment was soon afterwards complete in the voluntary forgiveness of Mrs. Smith, who, by stating his marriage with a woman of character, as the source of her clemency, gave him reason for believing that had he behaved with honour towards Marianne, he might at once have been happy and rich.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
15  Such was the sentence which, when misunderstood, so justly offended the delicate feelings of Mrs. Jennings; but after this narration of what really passed between Colonel Brandon and Elinor, while they stood at the window, the gratitude expressed by the latter on their parting, may perhaps appear in general, not less reasonably excited, nor less properly worded than if it had arisen from an offer of marriage.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39