MARRY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - marry in Sense and Sensibility
1  Your sisters will marry, and it will be gone for ever.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
2  I know why you inquire about him, very well; your sister is to marry him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
3  This little rectory CAN do no more than make Mr. Ferrars comfortable as a bachelor; it cannot enable him to marry.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39
4  The Colonel is a ninny, my dear; because he has two thousand a-year himself, he thinks that nobody else can marry on less.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
5  I will take my oath he never dropt a syllable of being tired of her, or of wishing to marry Miss Morton, or any thing like it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
6  I remember Fanny used to say that she would marry sooner and better than you did; not but what she is exceedingly fond of YOU, but so it happened to strike her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
7  I question whether Marianne NOW, will marry a man worth more than five or six hundred a-year, at the utmost, and I am very much deceived if YOU do not do better.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
8  She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
9  He has only two thousand pounds of his own; it would be madness to marry upon that, though for my own part, I could give up every prospect of more without a sigh.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
10  She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
11  Mrs. Jennings had been anxious to see Colonel Brandon well married, ever since her connection with Sir John first brought him to her knowledge; and she was always anxious to get a good husband for every pretty girl.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
12  Knowing all this, as I have now known it many weeks, guess what I must have felt on seeing your sister as fond of him as ever, and on being assured that she was to marry him: guess what I must have felt for all your sakes.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
13  If in the supposition of his seeking to marry herself, his difficulties from his mother had seemed great, how much greater were they now likely to be, when the object of his engagement was undoubtedly inferior in connections, and probably inferior in fortune to herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
14  But Elinor had no such dependence; for since Edward would still be unable to marry Miss Morton, and his chusing herself had been spoken of in Mrs. Ferrars's flattering language as only a lesser evil than his chusing Lucy Steele, she feared that Robert's offence would serve no other purpose than to enrich Fanny.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
15  Lucy became as necessary to Mrs. Ferrars, as either Robert or Fanny; and while Edward was never cordially forgiven for having once intended to marry her, and Elinor, though superior to her in fortune and birth, was spoken of as an intruder, SHE was in every thing considered, and always openly acknowledged, to be a favourite child.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
16  When we met him, he turned back and walked with us; and so we began talking of my brother and sister, and one thing and another, and I said to him, 'So, Colonel, there is a new family come to Barton cottage, I hear, and mama sends me word they are very pretty, and that one of them is going to be married to Mr. Willoughby of Combe Magna.'
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
17  She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother's great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars's resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN; that Mrs. Dashwood could neither pretend to be unconscious, nor endeavor to be calm.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
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