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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - may in Great Expectations
1  Now, I ain't alone, as you may think I am.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
2  It must be done, as I may say, on the sly.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
3  You may consider that you do, but you do not, Joseph.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
4  I may mention at once that this became an annual custom.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
5  I may truly say I've never had this apron of mine off since born you were.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
6  When or where that intention may be carried out, I cannot say; no one can say.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
7  There's one thing you may be sure of, Pip," said Joe, after some rumination, "namely, that lies is lies.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
8  The Educational scheme or Course established by Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt may be resolved into the following synopsis.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
9  And I am glad of another thing, and that is, that of course you know you may depend upon my keeping it and always so far deserving it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
10  There may be black ingratitude in the thing, and the punishment may be retributive and well deserved; but that it is a miserable thing, I can testify.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
11  And here I may remark that when Mr. Wopsle referred to me, he considered it a necessary part of such reference to rumple my hair and poke it into my eyes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
12  How much of my ungracious condition of mind may have been my own fault, how much Miss Havisham's, how much my sister's, is now of no moment to me or to any one.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
13  It may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small, and its rocking-horse stands as many hands high, according to scale, as a big-boned Irish hunter.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
14  It may have been about a month after my sister's reappearance in the kitchen, when Biddy came to us with a small speckled box containing the whole of her worldly effects, and became a blessing to the household.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
15  A boy may lock his door, may be warm in bed, may tuck himself up, may draw the clothes over his head, may think himself comfortable and safe, but that young man will softly creep and creep his way to him and tear him open.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
16  For you do not know that Uncle Pumblechook, being sensible that for anything we can tell, this boy's fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham's, has offered to take him into town to-night in his own chaise-cart, and to keep him to-night, and to take him with his own hands to Miss Havisham's to-morrow morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
17  As I never assisted at any other representation of George Barnwell, I don't know how long it may usually take; but I know very well that it took until half-past nine o clock that night, and that when Mr. Wopsle got into Newgate, I thought he never would go to the scaffold, he became so much slower than at any former period of his disgraceful career.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
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