MERIT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - merit in Sense and Sensibility
1  Do not be offended, Elinor, if my praise of him is not in every thing equal to your sense of his merits.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
2  Mrs. Jennings was very warm in her praise of Edward's conduct, but only Elinor and Marianne understood its true merit.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
3  I do assure you that you owe it entirely, at least almost entirely, to your own merit, and Colonel Brandon's discernment of it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
4  His complexion was white with agitation, and he looked as if fearful of his reception, and conscious that he merited no kind one.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48
5  For their brother's sake, too, for the sake of his own heart, she rejoiced; and she reproached herself for being unjust to his merit before, in believing him incapable of generosity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
6  Marianne assented most feelingly to the remark; and her mother was led by it to an enumeration of Colonel Brandon's injuries and merits, warm as friendship and design could unitedly dictate.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
7  Perhaps she pitied and esteemed him the more because he was slighted by Willoughby and Marianne, who, prejudiced against him for being neither lively nor young, seemed resolved to undervalue his merits.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
8  To the Middletons, to the Palmers, the Steeles, to every common acquaintance even, I had been insolent and unjust; with a heart hardened against their merits, and a temper irritated by their very attention.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
9  It was contrary to every doctrine of hers that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition; and that Elinor's merit should not be acknowledged by every one who knew her, was to her comprehension impossible.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
10  She felt that his influence over her mind was heightened by circumstances which ought not in reason to have weight; by that person of uncommon attraction, that open, affectionate, and lively manner which it was no merit to possess; and by that still ardent love for Marianne, which it was not even innocent to indulge.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45
11  Supported by the conviction of having done nothing to merit her present unhappiness, and consoled by the belief that Edward had done nothing to forfeit her esteem, she thought she could even now, under the first smart of the heavy blow, command herself enough to guard every suspicion of the truth from her mother and sisters.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
12  She thought it probable that as they lived in the same county, Mrs. Palmer might be able to give some more particular account of Willoughby's general character, than could be gathered from the Middletons' partial acquaintance with him; and she was eager to gain from any one, such a confirmation of his merits as might remove the possibility of fear from Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
13  She speedily comprehended all his merits; the persuasion of his regard for Elinor perhaps assisted her penetration; but she really felt assured of his worth: and even that quietness of manner, which militated against all her established ideas of what a young man's address ought to be, was no longer uninteresting when she knew his heart to be warm and his temper affectionate.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3