MORNING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - morning in Great Expectations
1  Good morning, sir, much obliged.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
2  It was a rimy morning, and very damp.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
3  You bring me, to-morrow morning early, that file and them wittles.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
4  It was in the early morning after my arrival that I entertained this speculation.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
5  In the same early morning, I discovered a singular affinity between seeds and corduroys.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  I also went to the coach-office and took my place for seven o'clock on Saturday morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
7  But, morning once more brightened my view, and I extended my clemency to Biddy, and we dropped the subject.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
8  For months afterwards, I every day settled the question finally in the negative, and reopened and reargued it next morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
9  I was afraid to sleep, even if I had been inclined, for I knew that at the first faint dawn of morning I must rob the pantry.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
10  I said that I would get him the file, and I would get him what broken bits of food I could, and I would come to him at the Battery, early in the morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
11  So, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, passed; and on Friday morning I went to Mr. Pumblechook's, to put on my new clothes and pay my visit to Miss Havisham.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
12  But I began packing that same afternoon, and wildly packed up things that I knew I should want next morning, in a fiction that there was not a moment to be lost.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
13  The felicitous idea occurred to me a morning or two later when I woke, that the best step I could take towards making myself uncommon was to get out of Biddy everything she knew.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
14  But when, in the clearer light of next morning, I began to reconsider the matter and to hear it discussed around me on all sides, I took another view of the case, which was more reasonable.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
15  My state of mind, as I have described it, began before I was up in the morning, and lasted long after the subject had died out, and had ceased to be mentioned saving on exceptional occasions.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
16  For you do not know that Uncle Pumblechook, being sensible that for anything we can tell, this boy's fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham's, has offered to take him into town to-night in his own chaise-cart, and to keep him to-night, and to take him with his own hands to Miss Havisham's to-morrow morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
17  At once ferocious and maudlin, I was made to murder my uncle with no extenuating circumstances whatever; Millwood put me down in argument, on every occasion; it became sheer monomania in my master's daughter to care a button for me; and all I can say for my gasping and procrastinating conduct on the fatal morning, is, that it was worthy of the general feebleness of my character.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
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