MOTHER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - mother in Sense and Sensibility
1  My mother was quite sick of it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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2  One's fortune, as your mother justly says, is NOT one's own.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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3  The resemblance between her and her mother was strikingly great.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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4  When my mother removes into another house my services shall be readily given to accommodate her as far as I can.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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5  Mrs. John Dashwood now installed herself mistress of Norland; and her mother and sisters-in-law were degraded to the condition of visitors.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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6  His mother wished to interest him in political concerns, to get him into parliament, or to see him connected with some of the great men of the day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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7  When your father and mother moved to Norland, though the furniture of Stanhill was sold, all the china, plate, and linen was saved, and is now left to your mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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8  The son, a steady respectable young man, was amply provided for by the fortune of his mother, which had been large, and half of which devolved on him on his coming of age.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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9  The prospect of four thousand a-year, in addition to his present income, besides the remaining half of his own mother's fortune, warmed his heart, and made him feel capable of generosity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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10  I have known a great deal of the trouble of annuities; for my mother was clogged with the payment of three to old superannuated servants by my father's will, and it is amazing how disagreeable she found it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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11  Their mother had nothing, and their father only seven thousand pounds in his own disposal; for the remaining moiety of his first wife's fortune was also secured to her child, and he had only a life-interest in it.
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12  She could consult with her brother, could receive her sister-in-law on her arrival, and treat her with proper attention; and could strive to rouse her mother to similar exertion, and encourage her to similar forbearance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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13  Her income was not her own, she said, with such perpetual claims on it; and it was the more unkind in my father, because, otherwise, the money would have been entirely at my mother's disposal, without any restriction whatever.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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14  But she could hear of no situation that at once answered her notions of comfort and ease, and suited the prudence of her eldest daughter, whose steadier judgment rejected several houses as too large for their income, which her mother would have approved.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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15  Some mothers might have encouraged the intimacy from motives of interest, for Edward Ferrars was the eldest son of a man who had died very rich; and some might have repressed it from motives of prudence, for, except a trifling sum, the whole of his fortune depended on the will of his mother.
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16  Do but consider, my dear Mr. Dashwood, how excessively comfortable your mother-in-law and her daughters may live on the interest of seven thousand pounds, besides the thousand pounds belonging to each of the girls, which brings them in fifty pounds a year a-piece, and, of course, they will pay their mother for their board out of it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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17  Elinor, this eldest daughter, whose advice was so effectual, possessed a strength of understanding, and coolness of judgment, which qualified her, though only nineteen, to be the counsellor of her mother, and enabled her frequently to counteract, to the advantage of them all, that eagerness of mind in Mrs. Dashwood which must generally have led to imprudence.
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