MUTUAL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - mutual in Sense and Sensibility
1  A mutual silence took place for some time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
2  A short pause of mutual thoughtfulness succeeded.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44
3  She believed the regard to be mutual; but she required greater certainty of it to make Marianne's conviction of their attachment agreeable to her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
4  They speedily discovered that their enjoyment of dancing and music was mutual, and that it arose from a general conformity of judgment in all that related to either.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
5  Your case is a very unfortunate one; you seem to me to be surrounded with difficulties, and you will have need of all your mutual affection to support you under them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
6  He dared not come to Bartlett's Buildings for fear of detection, and though their mutual impatience to meet, was not to be told, they could do nothing at present but write.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
7  To Marianne, indeed, the meeting between Edward and her sister was but a continuation of that unaccountable coldness which she had often observed at Norland in their mutual behaviour.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
8  This suspicion was given by some words which accidently dropped from him one evening at the park, when they were sitting down together by mutual consent, while the others were dancing.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
9  There was a kind of cold hearted selfishness on both sides, which mutually attracted them; and they sympathised with each other in an insipid propriety of demeanor, and a general want of understanding.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
10  And with this admirable discretion did she defer the assurance of her finding their mutual relatives more disagreeable than ever, and of her being particularly disgusted with his mother, till they were more in private.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
11  She acknowledged, therefore, that though she had never been informed by themselves of the terms on which they stood with each other, of their mutual affection she had no doubt, and of their correspondence she was not astonished to hear.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
12  On the contrary, with a mind and body alike strengthened by rest, she looked and spoke with more genuine spirit, anticipating the pleasure of Margaret's return, and talking of the dear family party which would then be restored, of their mutual pursuits and cheerful society, as the only happiness worth a wish.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
13  He was received by Mrs. Dashwood with more than politeness; with a kindness which Sir John's account of him and her own gratitude prompted; and every thing that passed during the visit tended to assure him of the sense, elegance, mutual affection, and domestic comfort of the family to whom accident had now introduced him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
14  Their resemblance in good principles and good sense, in disposition and manner of thinking, would probably have been sufficient to unite them in friendship, without any other attraction; but their being in love with two sisters, and two sisters fond of each other, made that mutual regard inevitable and immediate, which might otherwise have waited the effect of time and judgment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49