NATURE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - nature in Sense and Sensibility
1  I know very well that Colonel Brandon is not old enough to make his friends yet apprehensive of losing him in the course of nature.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
2  I could rather believe every creature of my acquaintance leagued together to ruin me in his opinion, than believe his nature capable of such cruelty.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
3  John Dashwood was greatly astonished; but his nature was calm, not open to provocation, and he never wished to offend anybody, especially anybody of good fortune.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
4  I was prepared to meet you with the pleasure which our separation naturally produced, with the familiarity which our intimacy at Barton appeared to me to justify.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
5  Nay, the longer they were together the more doubtful seemed the nature of his regard; and sometimes, for a few painful minutes, she believed it to be no more than friendship.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
6  What Mrs. Ferrars would say and do, though there could not be a doubt of its nature, she was anxious to hear; and still more anxious to know how Edward would conduct himself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
7  Continual engagements at home and abroad, however, supplied all the deficiencies of nature and education; supported the good spirits of Sir John, and gave exercise to the good breeding of his wife.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  Mrs. Palmer, on the contrary, who was strongly endowed by nature with a turn for being uniformly civil and happy, was hardly seated before her admiration of the parlour and every thing in it burst forth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
9  There were moments in abundance, when, if not by the absence of her mother and sisters, at least by the nature of their employments, conversation was forbidden among them, and every effect of solitude was produced.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
10  Mr. John Dashwood had not the strong feelings of the rest of the family; but he was affected by a recommendation of such a nature at such a time, and he promised to do every thing in his power to make them comfortable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
11  The nature of her commendation, in the present case, however, happened to be particularly ill-suited to the feelings of two thirds of her auditors, and was so very unexhilarating to Edward, that he very soon got up to go away.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
12  Because he believes many people pretend to more admiration of the beauties of nature than they really feel, and is disgusted with such pretensions, he affects greater indifference and less discrimination in viewing them himself than he possesses.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
13  Her complexion was sallow; and her features small, without beauty, and naturally without expression; but a lucky contraction of the brow had rescued her countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill nature.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
14  Her complexion was sallow; and her features small, without beauty, and naturally without expression; but a lucky contraction of the brow had rescued her countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill nature.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
15  It was a valued, a precious trust to me; and gladly would I have discharged it in the strictest sense, by watching over her education myself, had the nature of our situations allowed it; but I had no family, no home; and my little Eliza was therefore placed at school.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
16  The attachment, from which against honour, against feeling, against every better interest he had outwardly torn himself, now, when no longer allowable, governed every thought; and the connection, for the sake of which he had, with little scruple, left her sister to misery, was likely to prove a source of unhappiness to himself of a far more incurable nature.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44
17  In every meeting of the kind Willoughby was included; and the ease and familiarity which naturally attended these parties were exactly calculated to give increasing intimacy to his acquaintance with the Dashwoods, to afford him opportunity of witnessing the excellencies of Marianne, of marking his animated admiration of her, and of receiving, in her behaviour to himself, the most pointed assurance of her affection.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.