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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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1  This, and Marianne's blushing, gave new suspicions to Edward.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
2  They will tell me I should write to the Doctor, to get Edward the curacy of his new living.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
3  Nothing new was heard by them, for a day or two afterwards, of affairs in Harley Street, or Bartlett's Buildings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
4  She had heard nothing of him since her leaving London, nothing new of his plans, nothing certain even of his present abode.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
5  The subject was continued no farther; and Marianne remained thoughtfully silent, till a new object suddenly engaged her attention.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
6  Nor could she leave the place in which Willoughby remained, busy in new engagements, and new schemes, in which SHE could have no share, without shedding many tears.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
7  This was quite a new idea to Mrs. Dashwood; she had never been used to find wit in the inattention of any one, and could not help looking with surprise at them both.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
8  She could soon tell at what coachmaker's the new carriage was building, by what painter Mr. Willoughby's portrait was drawn, and at what warehouse Miss Grey's clothes might be seen.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
9  She vowed at first she would never trim me up a new bonnet, nor do any thing else for me again, so long as she lived; but now she is quite come to, and we are as good friends as ever.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
10  The arrival of a new family in the country was always a matter of joy to him, and in every point of view he was charmed with the inhabitants he had now procured for his cottage at Barton.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
11  and this prepared a future mine of raillery against the devoted Elinor, which nothing but the newness of their acquaintance with Edward could have prevented from being immediately sprung.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
12  In Colonel Brandon alone, of all her new acquaintance, did Elinor find a person who could in any degree claim the respect of abilities, excite the interest of friendship, or give pleasure as a companion.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
13  We will walk to the farm at the edge of the down, and see how the children go on; we will walk to Sir John's new plantations at Barton Cross, and the Abbeyland; and we will often go the old ruins of the Priory, and try to trace its foundations as far as we are told they once reached.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
14  When we met him, he turned back and walked with us; and so we began talking of my brother and sister, and one thing and another, and I said to him, 'So, Colonel, there is a new family come to Barton cottage, I hear, and mama sends me word they are very pretty, and that one of them is going to be married to Mr. Willoughby of Combe Magna.'
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
15  Marianne's eagerness to be gone declared her dependence on finding him there; and Elinor was resolved not only upon gaining every new light as to his character which her own observation or the intelligence of others could give her, but likewise upon watching his behaviour to her sister with such zealous attention, as to ascertain what he was and what he meant, before many meetings had taken place.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26