NIGHT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - night in Great Expectations
1  "Goo-good night, sir," I faltered.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
2  There they remained, a nightmare to me, many and many a night and day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
3  There was a conwict off last night," said Joe, aloud, "after sunset-gun.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
4  Young as I was, I believe that I dated a new admiration of Joe from that night.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
5  It was a dry cold night, and the wind blew keenly, and the frost was white and hard.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
6  One night I was sitting in the chimney corner with my slate, expending great efforts on the production of a letter to Joe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
7  Then I put the fastenings as I had found them, opened the door at which I had entered when I ran home last night, shut it, and ran for the misty marshes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
8  After Mr. Pumblechook had driven off, and when my sister was washing up, I stole into the forge to Joe, and remained by him until he had done for the night.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
9  I had seen the damp lying on the outside of my little window, as if some goblin had been crying there all night, and using the window for a pocket-handkerchief.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
10  When a man's alone on these flats, with a light head and a light stomach, perishing of cold and want, he hears nothin all night, but guns firing, and voices calling.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
11  The fear of losing Joe's confidence, and of thenceforth sitting in the chimney corner at night staring drearily at my forever lost companion and friend, tied up my tongue.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
12  On the previous night, I had been sent straight to bed in an attic with a sloping roof, which was so low in the corner where the bedstead was, that I calculated the tiles as being within a foot of my eyebrows.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
13  There was no doing it in the night, for there was no getting a light by easy friction then; to have got one I must have struck it out of flint and steel, and have made a noise like the very pirate himself rattling his chains.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
14  This was all I heard that night before my sister clutched me, as a slumberous offence to the company's eyesight, and assisted me up to bed with such a strong hand that I seemed to have fifty boots on, and to be dangling them all against the edges of the stairs.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
15  In pursuance of this luminous conception I mentioned to Biddy when I went to Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt's at night, that I had a particular reason for wishing to get on in life, and that I should feel very much obliged to her if she would impart all her learning to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
16  If I slept at all that night, it was only to imagine myself drifting down the river on a strong spring-tide, to the Hulks; a ghostly pirate calling out to me through a speaking-trumpet, as I passed the gibbet-station, that I had better come ashore and be hanged there at once, and not put it off.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
17  It being Saturday night, I found the landlord looking rather grimly at these records; but as my business was with Joe and not with him, I merely wished him good evening, and passed into the common room at the end of the passage, where there was a bright large kitchen fire, and where Joe was smoking his pipe in company with Mr. Wopsle and a stranger.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
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