PROPER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - proper in Sense and Sensibility
1  She wondered, indeed, at his thinking it necessary to do so; but supposed it to be the proper etiquette.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39
2  Marianne's pianoforte was unpacked and properly disposed of; and Elinor's drawings were affixed to the walls of their sitting room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
3  Sincerely wish you happy in your choice, and it shall not be my fault if we are not always good friends, as our near relationship now makes proper.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
4  She was not immediately able to say anything, and even when her spirits were recovered, she debated for a short time, on the answer it would be most proper to give.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
5  But though confidence between them was, by this public discovery, restored to its proper state, it was not a subject on which either of them were fond of dwelling when alone.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
6  You know what he thinks of Cowper and Scott; you are certain of his estimating their beauties as he ought, and you have received every assurance of his admiring Pope no more than is proper.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
7  If he would only have done as well by himself," said John Dashwood, "as all his friends were disposed to do by him, he might now have been in his proper situation, and would have wanted for nothing.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
8  How soon he had walked himself into the proper resolution, however, how soon an opportunity of exercising it occurred, in what manner he expressed himself, and how he was received, need not be particularly told.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
9  She could consult with her brother, could receive her sister-in-law on her arrival, and treat her with proper attention; and could strive to rouse her mother to similar exertion, and encourage her to similar forbearance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
10  After a proper resistance on the part of Mrs. Ferrars, just so violent and so steady as to preserve her from that reproach which she always seemed fearful of incurring, the reproach of being too amiable, Edward was admitted to her presence, and pronounced to be again her son.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
11  Elinor had just been congratulating herself, in the midst of her perplexity, that however difficult it might be to express herself properly by letter, it was at least preferable to giving the information by word of mouth, when her visitor entered, to force her upon this greatest exertion of all.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
12  He had nothing to urge against it, but still resisted the idea of a letter of proper submission; and therefore, to make it easier to him, as he declared a much greater willingness to make mean concessions by word of mouth than on paper, it was resolved that, instead of writing to Fanny, he should go to London, and personally intreat her good offices in his favour.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
13  Such was the sentence which, when misunderstood, so justly offended the delicate feelings of Mrs. Jennings; but after this narration of what really passed between Colonel Brandon and Elinor, while they stood at the window, the gratitude expressed by the latter on their parting, may perhaps appear in general, not less reasonably excited, nor less properly worded than if it had arisen from an offer of marriage.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39