PROPERTY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - property in Great Expectations
1  As far as it goes, it's property and portable.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
2  What I look at is the sacrifice of so much portable property.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
3  Whereas, the portable property certainly could have been saved.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
4  They may not be worth much, but, after all, they're property and portable.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
5  Skin the stockings off Mr. Waldengarver," said the owner of that property, "or you'll bust 'em.'
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXI
6  She might have been some two or three years younger than Wemmick, and I judged her to stand possessed of portable property.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
7  I am instructed to communicate to him," said Mr. Jaggers, throwing his finger at me sideways, "that he will come into a handsome property.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
8  He laid his hands upon my shoulders, and added in a solemn whisper: "Avail yourself of this evening to lay hold of his portable property."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
9  Whereas the Boar had cultivated my good opinion with warm assiduity when I was coming into property, the Boar was exceedingly cool on the subject now that I was going out of property.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVIII
10  What I had meant was, that when I came into my property and was able to do something for Joe, it would have been much more agreeable if he had been better qualified for a rise in station.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
11  But Joe, taking it up carefully with both hands, like a bird's-nest with eggs in it, wouldn't hear of parting with that piece of property, and persisted in standing talking over it in a most uncomfortable way.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
12  We left him bestirring himself to feed the fowls, and we sat down to our punch in the arbor; where Wemmick told me, as he smoked a pipe, that it had taken him a good many years to bring the property up to its present pitch of perfection.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
13  Between him and me, secret articles were signed of which Herbert was the subject, and I paid him half of my five hundred pounds down, and engaged for sundry other payments: some, to fall due at certain dates out of my income: some, contingent on my coming into my property.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
14  It was not necessary to explain everywhere that I had come into a handsome property; but whenever I said anything to that effect, it followed that the officiating tradesman ceased to have his attention diverted through the window by the High Street, and concentrated his mind upon me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
15  At last, when we got to his place of business and he pulled out his key from his coat-collar, he looked as unconscious of his Walworth property as if the Castle and the drawbridge and the arbor and the lake and the fountain and the Aged, had all been blown into space together by the last discharge of the Stinger.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
16  I inferred from the methodical nature of Miss Skiffins's arrangements that she made tea there every Sunday night; and I rather suspected that a classic brooch she wore, representing the profile of an undesirable female with a very straight nose and a very new moon, was a piece of portable property that had been given her by Wemmick.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII