RAN in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
 Search Panel
Word:
 You may input your word too.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
Sort by:
 Current Search - ran in Great Expectations
1  I held on tight, while Mrs. Joe and Joe ran to him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
2  I released the leg of the table, and ran for my life.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
3  Their pieces were cocked and levelled when we all ran in.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
4  But now I was frightened again, and ran home without stopping.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
5  And when it had come to this, the soldiers ran like deer, and Joe too.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
6  Again he took both my hands and put them to his lips, while my blood ran cold within me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
7  As she had never said any word for a long while, I ran and fetched in Mr. Gargery from the forge.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
8  Joe caught up his hat again, and ran with them to the Jolly Bargemen to restore them to their owner.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
9  When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
10  The sergeant ran in first, when we had run the noise quite down, and two of his men ran in close upon him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
11  It was not because I was faithful, but because Joe was faithful, that I never ran away and went for a soldier or a sailor.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
12  I brought it out, and laid it ready for him, and my blood again ran cold when he again took me by both hands to give me good night.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
13  Then I put the fastenings as I had found them, opened the door at which I had entered when I ran home last night, shut it, and ran for the misty marshes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
14  In the terror of seeing the figure, and in the terror of being certain that it had not been there a moment before, I at first ran from it, and then ran towards it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
15  For, we always ran into new debt immediately, to the full extent of the margin, and sometimes, in the sense of freedom and solvency it imparted, got pretty far on into another margin.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
16  As the man made no answer when I asked him what he did there, but eluded my touch in silence, I ran to the Lodge and urged the watchman to come quickly; telling him of the incident on the way back.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
17  They took up several obviously wrong people, and they ran their heads very hard against wrong ideas, and persisted in trying to fit the circumstances to the ideas, instead of trying to extract ideas from the circumstances.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
18  I thanked him and ran home again, and there I found that Joe had already locked the front door and vacated the state parlor, and was seated by the kitchen fire with a hand on each knee, gazing intently at the burning coals.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
19  'Consequence, my mother and me we ran away from my father several times; and then my mother she'd go out to work, and she'd say, "Joe," she'd say, "now, please God, you shall have some schooling, child," and she'd put me to school.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
20  For all that I knew this perfectly well, I still felt as if it were not safe to let the coach-office be out of my sight longer than five minutes at a time; and in this condition of unreason I had performed the first half-hour of a watch of four or five hours, when Wemmick ran against me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII