READING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - reading in Great Expectations
1  You're out in your reading of Hamlet when you get your legs in profile.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXI
2  But I'll tell you one thing, Mr. Waldengarver," said the man who was on his knees, "in which you're out in your reading.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXI
3  At the time when I stood in the churchyard reading the family tombstones, I had just enough learning to be able to spell them out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
4  The Aged's reading reminded me of the classes at Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt's, with the pleasanter peculiarity that it seemed to come through a keyhole.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
5  Startop, younger in years and appearance, was reading and holding his head, as if he thought himself in danger of exploding it with too strong a charge of knowledge.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
6  Mrs. Pocket was sitting on a garden chair under a tree, reading, with her legs upon another garden chair; and Mrs. Pocket's two nurse-maids were looking about them while the children played.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
7  She rented a small cottage, and Mr. Wopsle had the room up stairs, where we students used to overhear him reading aloud in a most dignified and terrific manner, and occasionally bumping on the ceiling.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
8  It further appeared that the book I had seen Mrs. Pocket reading in the garden was all about titles, and that she knew the exact date at which her grandpapa would have come into the book, if he ever had come at all.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
9  Taking the table to represent the path of virtue, I am justified in stating that during the whole time of the Aged's reading, Wemmick's arm was straying from the path of virtue and being recalled to it by Miss Skiffins.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII