RESPECT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - respect in Great Expectations
1  His spirit inspired me with great respect.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
2  I wish to say something respecting this escape.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
3  I lived in a state of chronic uneasiness respecting my behavior to Joe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
4  That sausage you toasted was his, and he was in all respects a first-rater.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
5  That Colonel durst no more take leave of him, than that turnkey durst ask him his intentions respecting a case.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
6  He may be too proud to let any one take him out of a place that he is competent to fill, and fills well and with respect.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
7  It was a song that imitated the measure of beating upon iron, and was a mere lyrical excuse for the introduction of Old Clem's respected name.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
8  In a corner was a little table of papers with a shaded lamp: so that he seemed to bring the office home with him in that respect too, and to wheel it out of an evening and fall to work.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
9  In one or two instances there was a difficulty respecting the raising of fees, and then Mr. Wemmick, backing as far as possible from the insufficient money produced, said, "it's no use, my boy."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
10  I had little objection to his being seen by Herbert or his father, for both of whom I had a respect; but I had the sharpest sensitiveness as to his being seen by Drummle, whom I held in contempt.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
11  She was most noticeable, I thought, in respect of her extremities; for, her hair always wanted brushing, her hands always wanted washing, and her shoes always wanted mending and pulling up at heel.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
12  Still, Mrs. Pocket was in general the object of a queer sort of respectful pity, because she had not married a title; while Mr. Pocket was the object of a queer sort of forgiving reproach, because he had never got one.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
13  I wrote, however, to Mr. Trabb by next day's post, to say that Mr. Pip must decline to deal further with one who could so far forget what he owed to the best interests of society, as to employ a boy who excited Loathing in every respectable mind.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
14  It was a smooth way of going on, perhaps, in respect of saving trouble; but it had the appearance of being expensive, for the servants felt it a duty they owed to themselves to be nice in their eating and drinking, and to keep a deal of company down stairs.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
15  There being to my knowledge a respectable lodging-house in Essex Street, the back of which looked into the Temple, and was almost within hail of my windows, I first of all repaired to that house, and was so fortunate as to secure the second floor for my uncle, Mr. Provis.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
16  I was made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket's falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and, forgetting all about the baby on her lap, who did most appalling things with the nut-crackers.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
17  Of the manner and extent to which he took our trumps into custody, and came out with mean little cards at the ends of hands, before which the glory of our Kings and Queens was utterly abased, I say nothing; nor, of the feeling that I had, respecting his looking upon us personally in the light of three very obvious and poor riddles that he had found out long ago.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
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