RICH in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - rich in Sense and Sensibility
1  But the family are all rich together.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
2  Men are very safe with us, let them be ever so rich.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
3  It was a pleasant fertile spot, well wooded, and rich in pasture.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
4  It would be an excellent match, for HE was rich, and SHE was handsome.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
5  Mrs. Smith has this morning exercised the privilege of riches upon a poor dependent cousin, by sending me on business to London.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
6  She could easily conceive that marriage might not be immediately in their power; for though Willoughby was independent, there was no reason to believe him rich.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
7  Her mother too, in whose mind not one speculative thought of their marriage had been raised, by his prospect of riches, was led before the end of a week to hope and expect it; and secretly to congratulate herself on having gained two such sons-in-law as Edward and Willoughby.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
8  Some mothers might have encouraged the intimacy from motives of interest, for Edward Ferrars was the eldest son of a man who had died very rich; and some might have repressed it from motives of prudence, for, except a trifling sum, the whole of his fortune depended on the will of his mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
9  Willoughby could not hear of her marriage without a pang; and his punishment was soon afterwards complete in the voluntary forgiveness of Mrs. Smith, who, by stating his marriage with a woman of character, as the source of her clemency, gave him reason for believing that had he behaved with honour towards Marianne, he might at once have been happy and rich.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50