RIVER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - river in Great Expectations
1  In the evening there was rowing on the river.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
2  A river's its natural depth, and he's his natural depth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
3  Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
4  Now and then, the sound of the signal cannon broke upon us again, and again rolled sulkily along the course of the river.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
5  As to the convicts, they went their way with the coach, and I knew at what point they would be spirited off to the river.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
6  Presently we saw other torches kindled at some distance behind us, and others on the marshes on the opposite bank of the river.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
7  Having made this lunatic confession, I began to throw my torn-up grass into the river, as if I had some thoughts of following it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
8  Lifting the latch of a gate, we passed direct into a little garden overlooking the river, where Mr. Pocket's children were playing about.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
9  Under the low red glare of sunset, the beacon, and the gibbet, and the mound of the Battery, and the opposite shore of the river, were plain, though all of a watery lead color.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
10  There was a reasonably good path now, mostly on the edge of the river, with a divergence here and there where a dike came, with a miniature windmill on it and a muddy sluice-gate.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
11  All this time, I was getting on towards the river; but however fast I went, I couldn't warm my feet, to which the damp cold seemed riveted, as the iron was riveted to the leg of the man I was running to meet.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
12  It was pleasant and quiet, out there with the sails on the river passing beyond the earthwork, and sometimes, when the tide was low, looking as if they belonged to sunken ships that were still sailing on at the bottom of the water.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
13  In effect, we had not walked many yards further, when the well-remembered boom came towards us, deadened by the mist, and heavily rolled away along the low grounds by the river, as if it were pursuing and threatening the fugitives.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
14  The marshes were just a long black horizontal line then, as I stopped to look after him; and the river was just another horizontal line, not nearly so broad nor yet so black; and the sky was just a row of long angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
15  And now the range of marshes lay clear before us, with the sails of the ships on the river growing out of it; and we went into the churchyard, close to the graves of my unknown parents, Philip Pirrip, late of this parish, and Also Georgiana, Wife of the Above.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
16  But presently I looked over my shoulder, and saw him going on again towards the river, still hugging himself in both arms, and picking his way with his sore feet among the great stones dropped into the marshes here and there, for stepping-places when the rains were heavy or the tide was in.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
17  If I slept at all that night, it was only to imagine myself drifting down the river on a strong spring-tide, to the Hulks; a ghostly pirate calling out to me through a speaking-trumpet, as I passed the gibbet-station, that I had better come ashore and be hanged there at once, and not put it off.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
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