SPEAK in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - speak in Sense and Sensibility
1  He did not speak, he did not behave like himself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
2  Now, I can think and speak of it with little emotion.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
3  I would by no means speak disrespectfully of any relation of yours, madam.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
4  Mrs. Dashwood was too much astonished to speak, and another pause succeeded.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
5  Elinor, affected by his relation, and still more by his distress, could not speak.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
6  Go to him, Elinor," she cried, as soon as she could speak, "and force him to come to me.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
7  Edward was the first to speak, and it was to notice Marianne's altered looks, and express his fear of her not finding London agree with her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
8  They had scarcely been two minutes by themselves, before he began to speak of Edward; for he, too, had heard of the living, and was very inquisitive on the subject.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41
9  She soon caught his eye, and he immediately bowed, but without attempting to speak to her, or to approach Marianne, though he could not but see her; and then continued his discourse with the same lady.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
10  She avoided the looks of them all, could neither eat nor speak, and after some time, on her mother's silently pressing her hand with tender compassion, her small degree of fortitude was quite overcome, she burst into tears and left the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
11  Elinor paid her every quiet and unobtrusive attention in her power; and she would have tried to sooth and tranquilize her still more, had not Marianne entreated her, with all the eagerness of the most nervous irritability, not to speak to her for the world.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
12  The latter, though unable to speak, seemed to feel all the tenderness of this behaviour, and after some time thus spent in joint affliction, she put all the letters into Elinor's hands; and then covering her face with her handkerchief, almost screamed with agony.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
13  He heard her with the most earnest attention, but seeming to recollect himself, said no more on the subject, and began directly to speak of his pleasure at seeing them in London, making the usual inquiries about their journey, and the friends they had left behind.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
14  He had met Mrs. Jennings at the door in her way to the carriage, as he came to leave his farewell card; and she, after apologising for not returning herself, had obliged him to enter, by saying that Miss Dashwood was above, and wanted to speak with him on very particular business.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
15  Had she tried to speak, or had she been conscious of half Mrs. Jennings's well-meant but ill-judged attentions to her, this calmness could not have been maintained; but not a syllable escaped her lips; and the abstraction of her thoughts preserved her in ignorance of every thing that was passing before her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
16  Her indignation would have been still stronger than it was, had she not witnessed that embarrassment which seemed to speak a consciousness of his own misconduct, and prevented her from believing him so unprincipled as to have been sporting with the affections of her sister from the first, without any design that would bear investigation.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
17  With difficulty however could she prevent her from following him herself; and to persuade her to check her agitation, to wait, at least, with the appearance of composure, till she might speak to him with more privacy and more effect, was impossible; for Marianne continued incessantly to give way in a low voice to the misery of her feelings, by exclamations of wretchedness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
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