TIME in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - time in Sense and Sensibility
1  She needed no time for deliberation or inquiry.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
2  The time may come when Harry will regret that so large a sum was parted with.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  He did not know what he was talking of, I dare say; ten to one but he was light-headed at the time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
4  But as he required the promise, I could not do less than give it; at least I thought so at the time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
5  Now was the time when her son-in-law's promise to his father might with particular propriety be fulfilled.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
6  The reasons for this alteration were at the same time related, and they were such as to make further entreaty on his side impossible.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
7  Colonel Brandon again repeated his sorrow at being the cause of disappointing the party; but at the same time declared it to be unavoidable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
8  Twice did I leave them purposely together in the course of the last morning, and each time did he most unaccountably follow me out of the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
9  Lady Middleton had the advantage of being able to spoil her children all the year round, while Sir John's independent employments were in existence only half the time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
10  Most unwilling was she to awaken from such a dream of felicity to comprehend all the unhappy truths which attended the affair; and for some time she refused to submit to them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
11  His attentive behaviour to herself and his sisters convinced her that their welfare was dear to him, and, for a long time, she firmly relied on the liberality of his intentions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
12  Edward had been staying several weeks in the house before he engaged much of Mrs. Dashwood's attention; for she was, at that time, in such affliction as rendered her careless of surrounding objects.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
13  If dancing formed the amusement of the night, they were partners for half the time; and when obliged to separate for a couple of dances, were careful to stand together and scarcely spoke a word to any body else.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
14  Mr. John Dashwood had not the strong feelings of the rest of the family; but he was affected by a recommendation of such a nature at such a time, and he promised to do every thing in his power to make them comfortable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
15  Willoughby had spent the preceding evening with them, and Margaret, by being left some time in the parlour with only him and Marianne, had had opportunity for observations, which, with a most important face, she communicated to her eldest sister, when they were next by themselves.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
16  This circumstance was a growing attachment between her eldest girl and the brother of Mrs. John Dashwood, a gentleman-like and pleasing young man, who was introduced to their acquaintance soon after his sister's establishment at Norland, and who had since spent the greatest part of his time there.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
17  Little had Mrs. Dashwood or her daughters imagined when they first came into Devonshire, that so many engagements would arise to occupy their time as shortly presented themselves, or that they should have such frequent invitations and such constant visitors as to leave them little leisure for serious employment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
18  With the size and furniture of the house Mrs. Dashwood was upon the whole well satisfied; for though her former style of life rendered many additions to the latter indispensable, yet to add and improve was a delight to her; and she had at this time ready money enough to supply all that was wanted of greater elegance to the apartments.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
19  Mrs. Jennings laughed heartily; and Elinor found that in her resolution to know where they had been, she had actually made her own woman enquire of Mr. Willoughby's groom; and that she had by that method been informed that they had gone to Allenham, and spent a considerable time there in walking about the garden and going all over the house.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
20  In the mean time, till all these alterations could be made from the savings of an income of five hundred a-year by a woman who never saved in her life, they were wise enough to be contented with the house as it was; and each of them was busy in arranging their particular concerns, and endeavoring, by placing around them books and other possessions, to form themselves a home.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6